Jung-Braunschweig-Bevern Fusiliers

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Hierarchical Path: Seven Years War (Main Page) >> Armies >> Prussian Army >> Jung-Braunschweig-Bevern Fusiliers

Origin and History

On October 15 1756, when the Saxon Army surrendered to Frederick II near Pirna, the Saxon infantry was forcefully incorporated into the Prussian Army, former Prinz Xaver Infantry thus becoming Infanterie-Regiment (Nr. 57) Jung-Braunschweig-Bevern.

During the Seven Years' War, the regiment was under the command of:

  • since December 26 1756: Major-General Karl Duke of Braunschweig-Bevern (aka Jung Bevern)

Service during the War

In October 1756, the regiment was assigned to the garrisons of Krossen and Kottbus.

Respectively on March 28 and 30 1757, the 2nd and 1st battalions mutinied and escaped to Poland. However, the regiment was soon re-established with new levies. On November 12, the new 1st battalion capitulated at Schweidnitz while the new 2nd battalion was lost on November 25 during the retreat from Breslau. The regiment was not re-established.

N.B.: the grenadiers from the wing grenadier companies were put together with the grenadiers of Manstein Fusiliers, forming the S-53/S-57 Diezelsky Grenadier Battalion (please refer to this article for the details of the service of the grenadiers during the war).

Uniform

Privates

Uniform in 1756 - Source: Dal
Uniform Details
Headgear
Fusilier black tricorne laced white with a light blue pompom, light blue tassels and a small yellow button
Grenadier mitre with polished brass front plate; light straw headband with a light blue braid and brass ornaments, light straw backing with a similar braid, light blue pompom
Neckstock black
Coat Prussian blue lined red, 6 yellow buttons grouped 2 by 2 on the chest and 3 yellow buttons on each side to fasten the skirts forming the turnbacks
Collar none
Shoulder Straps n/a
Lapels none
Pockets horizontal pockets edged in red, each with 3 yellow buttons
Cuffs light straw (in the Swedish pattern) with 2 yellow buttons
Turnbacks red, each fastened with a small yellow button
Waistcoat light straw
Breeches light straw
Gaiters black
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt white
Waistbelt white
Cartridge Box black
Bayonet Scabbard brown
Scabbard brown
Footgear black shoes


Privates were armed with a short musket, a bayonet and a sabre with a curved blade.

NCOs

NCOs wore uniforms similar to those of the privates with the following distinctions:

  • black tricorne laced gold with black and white quartered pompom and black within white tassels
  • no shoulder straps
  • gold laced cuffs
  • yellowish leather gloves
  • black and white sabre tassel

NCOs were armed with a sabre and a half-pikes measuring 7 ½ Rhenish feet (2.37 m.) in the fusilier companies and 13 Rhenish feet (4.10 m.) in the grenadier companies (carried by the 3 most senior NCOs while other grenadier NCOs were armed with rifled muskets since 1744).

NCOs also carried canes (normally attached to a button at the top of the right front while carrying the half-pike).

Officers

Officers wore uniforms similar to those of the privates with the following differences:

  • black tricorne laced with a wide golden braid with a black cockade fastened with a golden clip; black within silver tassels
  • no shoulder strap
  • no turnbacks

Officers carried spontoons measuring 7 ½ Rhenish feet (2.36 m.).

Musicians

n/a

Colours

Colonel Colour (Leibfahne): White field with a yellow flamed cross. Centre device consisting of a light blue medallion surrounded by a golden laurel wreath and surmounted by a gold crown. The medallion is decorated with a black eagle surmounted by a white scroll bearing the golden motto "Pro Gloria et Patria". Corner monograms (crowns, laurel wreaths, ciphers) and grenades in gold.

Regimental Colours (Kompaniefahnen): light blue field with a yellow flamed cross. Centre device consisting of a white medallion surrounded by a golden laurel wreath and surmounted by a gold crown. The medallion is decorated with a black eagle surmounted by a light blue scroll bearing the golden motto "Pro Gloria et Patria". Corner monograms (crowns, laurel wreaths, ciphers) and grenades in gold.

Colonel Colour - Source: rf-figuren from elements by Hannoverdidi
Regimental Colour - Source: rf-figuren from elements by Hannoverdidi

References

Gavan, Dal: Colours of the Saxon regiments in the Prussian service

Grosser Generalstab Kriegsgeschichtliche Abteilung II, Die Kriege Friedrichs des Grossen, Part 3 Der siebenjährige Krieg 1756-1763, Vol. 1 Pirna und Lobositz, Berlin, 1901, p. 125

N.B.: the section Service during the War is mostly derived from our articles depicting the various campaigns, battles and sieges.