Miltitz Cavalry

From Project Seven Years War
Jump to: navigation, search

Hierarchical Path: Seven Years War (Main Page) >> Armies >> Hesse-Kassel Army >> Miltitz Cavalry

Origin and History

Trooper of Miltitz Cavalry circa 1748 as per Morier - Copyright: Franco Saudelli and Marco Pagan

The regiment was raised in 1704 for Count Erbach. In 1705, it became the property of von Boyneburg and, in 1738, of von Gräffendorf. The same year, von Miltitz became inhaber of the regiment.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the regiment took part in the battles of Blenheim (August 13, 1704) and Malplaquet (September 11, 1709).

During the War of the Austrian Succession, the regiment was attached to an Austrian Corps serving in Saxony.

At the beginning of the Seven Years' War, the regiment counted 360 men formed into 2 squadrons.

In 1760, the regiment was reorganized into a unit of 400 men.

During the Seven Years' War, the regimental inhabers were:

  • since 1738: von Miltitz
  • from 1759: von Oheim
  • from 1760 to 1763: von Einsiedel

During the reforms of 1787, the regiment was amalgamated with the Leib Dragoons.

Service during the War

On July 26 1757, during the French invasion of Hanover, the regiment took part in the Battle of Hastenbeck where one of its squadrons fought in the centre of the second line while the other was left in Hameln. This latter squadron consisted of recruits who had not received their mounts yet.

On May 26 1758, the regiment was with the Corps of the Prince von Anhalt in the camp of Coesfeld. On May 31, this corps accompanied Ferdinand of Brunswick in his offensive on the west bank of the Rhine. On June 12, during the aborted attack on the French positions at Rheinberg, the regiment was in Spörcken's (second) column of attack under Major-General von Urff. On June 23, the regiment took part in the Battle of Krefeld where it was deployed on the right wing under the command of the Erbprinz (Hereditary Prince) of Brunswick.

In mid June 1759, the regiment was part of Wutginau's Corps which had taken position at Büren in Westphalia. On August 1, the regiment took part in the Battle of Minden where it was deployed in the second line of the 8th column under Lieutenant-General von Urff.

On July 31 1760, the regiment took part in the Battle of Warburg where it was deployed in the fourth line of the cavalry right wing, behind Ossendorf. On October 16, it fought in the Battle of Clostercamp.

Uniform

By the 1740's the horse troopers did not wear a cuirass any more.

During the Seven Years War, the regiment used a temporary field sign of oak leaves. The use of the field sign was due to the French cavalry having regiments with similar coat and facing colours.

1756 Uniform

Privates

Uniform in 1756 - Source: Frédéric Aubert
Uniform Details
Headgear black tricorne laced yellow with oak leaves as a field sign and a black cockade fastened with a brass button
Neck stock black
Coat white with a brass button on each side in the small of the back
Collar medium green
Shoulder strap Left shoulder: medium green fastened with a brass button
Right shoulder: medium green aiguillette
Lapels medium green, each with 6 brass buttons arranged 2-2-2
Cuffs medium green, each with 3 (maybe 4) brass buttons
Turnbacks medium green
Waistcoat white edged medium green
Breeches pale straw
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt white
Waistbelt white
Cartridge Box black
Scabbard black
Footgear black boots with white knee covers
Horse Furniture
Saddlecloth medium green edged with a yellow braid decorated with a medium green stripe; a golden armed and crowned Hessian lion in the rear corner
Housing medium green edged with a yellow braid decorated with a medium green stripe and a golden armed and crowned Hessian lion
Blanket roll medium green and white


Troopers were armed with a straight steel hilted sword, two pistols and a carbine. The carbine was slung from the shoulder belt on a swivel hook.

Officers

The officers had gold trim rather than yellow lace on their tricorne.

Musicians

Trumpeters wore reversed colours. They were usually mounted on white or grey horses.

The bugle cord was made of interwoven white and green braids. Any banner from the trumpet would use the same markings as those on the sabretache.

1761 Uniform

Privates

Uniform in 1761 - Source: Frédéric Aubert
Uniform Details
Headgear black tricorne laced yellow with oak leaves as a field sign and a black cockade fastened with a brass button
Neck stock black
Coat buff edged with a yellow braid decorated with 2 medium green stripes
Collar medium green
Shoulder strap Left shoulder: medium green fastened with a brass button
Lapels none
Cuffs medium green edged with a yellow braid decorated with 2 medium green stripes, each cuff with 2 brass buttons
Turnbacks buff edged with a yellow braid decorated with 2 medium green stripes
Sash medium green worn over the coat
Sabretache medium green edged with a yellow braid with 2 medium green stripes; decorated with the crowned cipher "FL"
Waistcoat medium green edged with a yellow braid decorated with 2 medium green stripes
Breeches pale straw
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt white
Waistbelt white
Cartridge Box black
Scabbard black
Footgear black boots with white knee covers
Horse Furniture
Saddlecloth medium green edged with a yellow braid decorated with a medium green stripe; the crowned arms of Hessen-Kassel within a golden laurel wreath in the rear corner
Housing medium green edged with a yellow braid decorated with a medium green stripe; decorated with the crowned arms of Hessen-Kassel within a golden laurel wreath
Blanket roll medium green and white


Troopers were armed with a straight steel hilted sword, two pistols and a carbine. The carbine was slung from the shoulder belt on a swivel hook. The cuirass was introduced only in 1764, after the war.

Officers

The officers had gold trim rather than yellow lace on their tricorne.

Musicians

Trumpeters wore reversed colours. They were usually mounted on white or grey horses.

The bugle cord was made of interwoven white and green braids. Any banner from the trumpet would use the same markings as those on the sabretache.

Colours

The flag poles were red. The standards had golden fringe, a golden finial, red/white/blue cords with silver tassels. The regiment carried a white Leib (colonel) standard and a regimental standard.

Leib standard: white field; centre device consisting of the armed Hessian lion in gold.

Squadron standard: medium green (black in 1763) field; centre device consisting of the armed Hessian lion in gold.

Sources differ concerning the Hessian Lion: it is alternatively illustrated armed or unarmed; facing the pole or the opposite direction.

Leib Standard - Source: Frédéric Aubert
Squadron Standard – Source: Frédéric Aubert

References

Henry, Mark: Hessian Army of the 7 Years War, Seven Years War Association Journal Vol. VII No. 3

Pengel & Hurt: German States in the Seven Years War 1740 to 1762, Imperial Press

Rogge, Christian: The French & Allied Armies in Germany during the Seven Years War, Frankfurt, 2006

Trenkle, K.: Nix wie weg… die Hesse komme, Verlanganstalt Marburg

N.B.: the section Service during the War is mostly derived from our articles depicting the various campaigns, battles and sieges.