Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment

From Project Seven Years War
Jump to: navigation, search

Hierarchical Path: Seven Years War (Main Page) >> Armies >> Austrian Army >> Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment

Note: The regiment was also known as the Stabs-Regiment. The spelling of the time often was: 'Staabs-'.

Origin and History

The establishment of the Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment was part of the re-organization of Generalstab duties in the Austrian army in 1758. The raising of the regiment took place in the first year of FML Lacy's tenure as Generalquartiermeister (quartermaster-general).

The original role of the new regiment was to provide general and staff guards for the army headquarters, a function which up to that time had to be performed by rotating detachments from the regular infantry. According to the Feldwachen-Reglement of February 15, 1758001 guards ranged from a complete grenadier company "with colours" and officers (see note 1, below) for a commanding field-marshal down to 6 Fusiliers (with 3 NCOs) for a major-general. Taking into account the number of general officers assembled in an Austrian army headquarters as well as the fact that other functionaries also were entitled to their own 'guards' and ordonnances it is evident that providing this personnel by details from the regular troops could put unreasonable strain and organizational disruption on these. Therefore FM Daun in his submission of December 21, 1757 to his queen-empress had asked for a special battalion for staff duties, which Maria Theresia in her resolution augmented to a regiment.

Additional duties of the Stabs-Infanterie related to the support in matters of internal security and baggage supervision to the Oberst vom General-Quartiermeister-Stab (colonel of the staff of the quartermaster-general), who was the military commanding officer of the headquarters.

The regiment was equipped with infantry cannon.

Considering the original duties mentioned above, it is surprising to find parts of the regiment in a combat role during the war.

Note 1
The Feldwachen-Reglement expressly prohibits the use of detachments from regular troops for Generals-und Staabswachen (“..und mithin von keinem Regimente mehr eine Wache für die Generals- und Staabspartheyen abzugeben seyn wird.”

So the colours mentioned here would have to be carried by the grenadiers of the Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment.


This original Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment was disbanded at the end of Seven Years' War; there is no direct continuity with other regiments of the same name created for the War of the Bavarian Succession and later campaigns. No written regimental history exists. Therefore it is difficult to come to a believable organizational history. It will be necessary to quote rather extensively from the publicly available sources which (it is hoped) will bear out the reached conclusions.

Organisation

Some spurious findings (given here in order to help readers to avoid them)
A) 'Schema Ihrer Roem. Kaiserl. zu Hungarn und Boeheim Koenigl. Apost. Majestaet regulirten Regimenter zu Fuss und zu Pferd, benebst der Artillerie, wie solche bis 1.ten Octobr. 1759. zu allerh. Feld- und Kriegs-Diensten sich würklich befinden', ..Trattner, Wien 1759
for the Stabs-Infanterie Regiment shows a named complement of 1 colonel, 5 lieutenant-colonels and 9 majors. The implication from this drawn in 'Geschichte derer Kayserlich Königlichen Regimenter, darinnen ... bis zum Jahr 1762, Franckfurt am Mayn, 1762' that “Es ist stärcker als solche, wie sich denn Anno 1759. an Staabs Officieren, 2.Obristen, 4. Obrist Lieutenants und 10. Obrist Wachtmeister dabey befunden” seems to go too far. While the regiment may have been used as a depot for staff officers who did service in the Generalquartiermeister-Stab, it surely was not so large as to have a requirement for such a large number of staff-officers (sufficient for 4 'normal' regiments).

1. Wrede002 does not give any information on the internal organisation of the Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment and only the following informations at all:

  • 1758 raised by the Generalquartiermeister FML Count Lacy; disbanded 1763
  • Inhaber (owner)
  • Commanding Officers
    • 1758: Colonel Johann Preiss
    • 1760: Colonel Johann Franz Mertens
    • 1761: Colonel Dominik Tomiotti de Fabris
Note 2
Ref. 004 gives Lieutenant-Colonel von Pracht as initial regiment commander and ref. 008 states that after the 1761/62 personnel reduction, Major Baron Enzenberg of the (by then dissolved) Jäger Corps (attached to the Pionnier Battalion) took over command of the Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment


2. A bit more can be found in the Neues Generalstabswerk003. There it is stated: that the regiment was raised in 1758 from levies from existing regiments to a strength of 32 officers, about 2700 other ranks, and counted six companies.

3. This info was clearly copied from a paper by Moritz von Angeli (of the Austrian Kriegsarchiv) on the history of the k. k. Generalstab004. He writes:

“The Stabs-(Infanterie) Regiment, 6 companies under command of a lieutenant-colonel and with an establishment of 31 officers, 709 Prima-Plana (i.e. Regimental staff) , NCOs, privates-first-class and carpenters and 1992 privates, altogether 2733 men.”

Note 3
Similarly, the information on the early k. k. Generalstab contained in ref 005, which may be more readily available than Angeli, is copied from ref.004.


There again is no further information on internal organization of the regiment. But it seems evident that:
a) a numerical strength of an (average) company of some 330 privates is far beyond the usual
b) reducing the figure of 709 by an appropriate amount for prima-plana for a regiment (about 35) and dividing by 6 leaves more than 100 NCOs per 'company'
c) 31 officers (plus the commanding officer) gives 5 officers per each of the 6 huge companies.

4. It is tempting to doubt the number of “6” companies given by Angeli, but there are other items in his paper which clearly are incorrect too, e.g. the numbers of officers for a Stabs-Infantry-Regiment as planned for in Lacy's Generals-Reglement of 1769006. With some juggling of figures and taking into account that the regiment could put into the field a battalion of 5 companies with a total of 600 men, according to the Oestreichische Militärische Zeitschrift of 1841 (in its article on the campaign of 1759008; there is an order of battle for September 1759), one actually arrives at a 3-battalions regiment with 15 'normal-sized ' companies. (It would need some additional subalterns, though).

5. But then there is the situation after the army reduction during the winter of 1761/62, which had a great impact on the Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment.008

Even at the beginning of 1761, order had been sent out to Daun to refrain from replacing losses in the Stabs-troops.

Initially Vienna wanted to completely do away with the Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment. After protests by the army command the following order was given:

“The regiment had to form 4 companies of: 1 Captain, 2 First-, 2 Second Lieutenants, 2 Sergeants, 2 Fouriers, 20 Corporals, 5 Musicians, 2 Fourierschützen, 40 PFCs, 4 Carpenters, 370 common soldiers and 50 Pionniers.”

Thus the strength of the regiment (even after inclusion of 200 pionniers) was reduced to a total of 2000 men.

Again, there is no indication of internal organisation and the use of huge 'companies' continues.

Trying to get at the organization with a different approach:

6. From other sources we learn that the regiment was divided into battalions and that it had grenadiers.
a) The 'Bautzen Manuscript'009 shows both: 2 battalions (commanders Lieutenant-Colonel von Pracht and Lieutenant-Colonel von Richardt) with the first battalion having (or consisting of) grenadiers
b) Another hint for grenadiers in the Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment: The Feldwachen-Reglement001 calls for a grenadier company as honour guard for a commanding Field-marshal, but forbids the use of regular fighting troops (note: the 1759 Generals-Reglement explicitly does foresee the presence of a regular grenadier company there
An argument from silence: in ref. 008 the Stabs-Füsilier-Bataillon is the only unit especially named as 'Füsilier'. This can be taken as an indication that there also could have been 'grenadiers'.
c) in most publicly available mentions of the regiment the word 'battalion' is used; it is considered unnecessary to list all these occurrences here. They will be given below.
d) Seyfahrt010 in his enclosed tableau gives the Regiment de l'Etat exactly the same strength (2 grenadier companies, 16 musketeer companies, 4 battalions, 2300 men) as all the other regular infantry regiments.

Manning

Angeli states: “Officers and men for Stabs-Infanterie were taken from Invalids”.

This needs some qualification. While the duty inside the headquarters may have been considered less strenuous, full invalids surely would not served. Light infantry (outpost) duties in the fielded battalions might have been even more demanding than normal infantry movements. The 1769 Generals-Reglement006 says that the Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment can be filled with younger or shorter men and officers can be used who physically cannot fully perform field duties. So the 1758 manning probably followed similar rules. (note: privates were also recruited; not all of them were semi-invalids)

Service during the War

In addition to its originally planned duties in the army headquarters, parts of the regiment did armed combat service; meaning that there must have been requirements to do so, but also spare capacities and capabilities.

The Austrian Army of the time being well-known for its light forces from the border lands (Grenzer) the driving factor may have been the impression of idleness by personnel in excess of the required headquarters' service. Also the grades of invalidity must have been rather low in many cases.

The first appearance outside the headquarter is found in the Wiener Zeitung of November 11, 1758011, which reports that on November 1 a Captain Schweller of the Stabs-Regiment led a detachment of 100 men into Prague, escorting a convoy of Prussian artillery captured at Hochkirch.

Next reports are in Augspurgische Ordinari-Post-Zeitung. From Prague on February 21,1759 it is written that the Staabs-Regiment (together with the Jäger-Corps) had done guard duty in Prague. On March 14, the regiment prepares and on the following days marches to Münchgrätz to the headquarters. And beginning of April, a guard from the same regiment (here called 'newly raised'; the raising of the Stabs-Infantry-Regiment in1758 must have taken its time) brings Prussian prisoners from Beck's March 26 action at Greiffenberg. On April 6 the 'remaining battalions of the new regiment which during the winter had been garrisoned here' left for the army headquarters.

The next mention found is the order of battle in the Oestreichische Militärische Zeitschrift 1841ref. 008 for September 18, 1759. This shows one 'Stabs-Füsilier-Bataillon of 600 men', together with Stabs-Jäger and Stabs-Dragoner and 2 hussar-regiments under the command of Major-General Emmerich Eszterhazy. This detachment on October 20 took part in an action near Belgern (Saxony) for which the 3 mounted units are specially mentioned. It is possible that the infantry was employed to occupy positions gained by the cavalry.

Annalen der Österreichischen Armee014 has an item to the effect that Captain von Staudt during the night of November 18 with 100 men of the Staabs-Infanterie-Regiment defended the town of Saaz in Bohemia (present-day Žatec, okres Louny) against an enemy party and thus saved a considerable depot. This is borne out by a single note in Historische Nachrichten015; the events around Maxen took all the public interest at this time.

On April 3, 1760, the Ordinari Münchner Zeitungen016 reports that Stabs-Dragoner-Regiment and Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment have been mustered in Prague and are ready to depart. This year the regiment is found in the light corps of Major-General von Ried. Notably it took part in the enterprise which Ried was ordered to undertake to interrupt the Prussian ammunition supplies along Elbe River during the siege and bombardment of Dresden (July 27, 1760). This ended in blowing up 100 Zentner (about 10,000 lbs) of powder at Riesa.016 and 017</stub>

Later in the year the Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment, still with Ried, took part in the actions leading up to the Battle of Torgau and in the battle itself.

At the end of October, the Austrian main army while positioned in the area between Meissen and Leipzig was expecting the advance of Frederick II. Ried was ordered to reconnoitre between the Elbe and Mulde rivers downstream towards Dessau. He had hardly left Kemberg when he ran into the strong Prussian cavalry advance guard. Trying to make a stand at Radis (near Düben) his detachment was mauled (Oct. 27). There and during his hurried retreat his units (among them a Stabs-Infanterie-Bataillon and the Stabs-Dragoner-Regiment) suffered considerable losses in killed and prisoners. (Ried's report is contained in ref. 018)

On the morning of November 3, Major-General Ried with his detachment (consisting of the Slavonisch-Brooder Grenzer, a Stabs-Infanterie battalion, 4 Jäger companies, the Stabs-Dragoner (5 sqns) and the Szechényi Hussars (5 sqns)) was stationed near Grosswig, at the extreme west end of the Austrians expecting the attack by the Prussian army. The advance of the first column of the King's wing pushed Ried back and aside into the woods, where he waited for the passing of the column. Having asked for and received orders to proceed as proposed he stationed his foot near the western end of the old abatis and his horse a bit farther in clearer country, Ried attacked (with in his own opinion good success) the right wing and even right rear of the King's attacking force, taking numerous prisoners, among them Lieutenant-General von Bülow. Zieten's attack separated Ried from the Austrian main force and also from Lacy's Corps. In the nightly inextricable confusion (with only the burning village of Süptitz as beacon) all central command activities ceased: subalterns had to take charge in trying to rejoin friendly forces. As one example of success Ried mentions the feat of Captain Kriedlin of the Stabs-Bataillon who managed to bring away 2 own cannons (the detachment lost 6). The other story made it into the Austrian army lore: “How Major Petrelli of the Staabs-Infanterie-Regiment by pretending to be commander of a Prussian Freibataillon – the blue uniform of the regiment helped – succeeded in escorting the Brooder as 'prisoners of war' through the enemy presence to Mockrehna and freedom'.018 and 020 make good reading

Even after the start of the reduction due to monetary problems (see 'Organization', no. 5, above) in 1761 and the drastic decrease of the regiment in 1762, there was enough capacity to put a armed-service battalion into the field.

In 1761, the regiment is reported in a regimental history of IR 37021 in a brigade under Major-General Simbschen (together with IR Bayreuth and Beck's Volunteers), which (by October 1761) was subordinated to FML Beck, then active in Lusatia.

The same reference writes for the spring of 1762 that the Stabscorps consisted of 2,042 Stabs-Infanterie, 338 Jägers and 340 Stabs-Dragoner.

A battalion (5 companies) of the Staabs-Infanterie-Regiment in 1762 (April 30) can be found as part of the k.k. contribution to the Reichsarmee under FM Serbelloni022

Neither appearance of the regiment seems to have led to armed action.

This completes the mentions of the Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment in readily available sources (some misleading finds are shown under the next heading). Contributing lucky findings, e.g. in regimental histories or newspaper accounts of the time would be welcomed. Archive searches might lead to additional information, but are felt to be unwarranted due to its minor contribution to the Seven Years' War.

Some spurious findings (given here in order to help readers to avoid them

A) Geschichte derer Kayserlich Königlichen Regimenter, darinnen ... bis zum Jahr 1762, Franckfurt am Mayn, 1762. pp. 117/118 The sentence “Es ist stärcker als solche, wie sich denn Anno 1759. an Staabs Officieren, 2.Obristen, 4. Obrist Lieutenants und 10. Obrist Wachtmeister dabey befunden” seems to be a conflation with information on the 'Grosser Generalstab'.

B) Annalen der Österreichischen Armee, Vol. 3 (also: Geschichte der Österreichischen Regimenter, Corps..; Vol. 3), Vienna by Catharina Gräfer, 1812 pp. 90-93

Gräfer tends to list rather indiscriminately officers under a unit heading, who made their names outside the times of attachment to this unit; which brings the temptation to check out the occasions shown in order to look for regimental involvement.

In the case of the Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment there are a number of names mentioned which occur in Angeli as members of the 'Grosser Generalstab' (e.g. Seeger, Beaulieu, Ripke, Elmpt, Kraus). The last two are pointed out as contributors to the storming of Schweidnitz; they are mentioned in Loudon's relation as members of the 'Grosser Generalstab'. The regiment did not take part. (Incidentally similar holds for the captions in the facsimile publication of the Albertina manuscript – Preiss, Tomiotti de Fabris)

C) Fortgesetzte Neue Genealogisch-Historische Nachrichten von..., Part 49, Leipzig 1766, p.43

This contains under the heading “Wir holen hier noch einige Militair-Beförderungen von 1759 nach” the following misinformation: “und das sogenannte Stabs-Infanterie-Regiment, welches im verwichenen Winter zu Prag von dem General Lasci aufgerichtet worden und nur zu Bedeckung des Haupt-Quartiers und der Bagage dienen sollte, kriegte der General-Wachtmeister, Fürst von Kinski.”

Uniform

Descriptions are based on the Bautzener Bilderhandschrift aus dem Jahre 1762009. Additions and differences from other sources are specifically noted below.

Interestingly the entry for this regiment differentiates for the First and Second Battalions. Furthermore, uniforms of officers show striking differences between battalions.

One probably should not infer too much from mostly schematic uniform manuscripts; but it is quite possible that the sentence from the Annalen der Österreichischen Armee vol 3014 die Stabsofficiere haben zugleich beym grossen Grl-Stabe, Dienste geleistet reflects the real, if unusual situation, even if it concerned maybe only the First Battalion: In the resolution of February 1758 creating the Generalstab it was laid down that members should wear blue coats the buttonholes of which as a matter of distinction should be edged with gold thread and here this unusual uniform feature is displayed.

First Battalion

This subscription for this battalion is “1 Bataillon Grenadiere” and the uniform is distinguished by the unusual Kaskett; furthermore the man carries a sabre to show his grenadier quality.

Privates

Uniform in 1762
as per the Bautzener Handschrift

completed with other sources where necessary
Headgear black Kaskett, that is a leather (or felt) cap, in shape rather like a Prussian Füsilier cap, but slightly lower and without headband; front plate almost as low as the cap's crown; the cap and the front plate are seamed with white braid; the cap with white braids from side to side and front to back crossing perpendicularly at the crown; the front plate adorned with a large white 'S' probably to mean 'Stab'
Neck&nbs;stock black
Coat dark blue lined white with 6 brass buttons arranged (1-2-3) on each side on the chest
Collar red
Shoulder Straps small (blue?) strap with short fringes (left shoulder only)
Lapels none
Pockets horizontal pockets, each with 3 brass buttons
Cuffs red, each with 3 brass buttons
Turnbacks white
Waistcoat dark blue with 2 rows of small brass buttons and with horizontal pockets, each with 3 brass buttons
Breeches white
Gaiters black
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt n/a
Waistbelt white with a brass buckle
Cartridge Box n/a
Bayonet Scabbard n/a
Scabbard brown
Footgear black shoes


Troopers were armed with a musket and with a short infantry sabre brass mounted.

NCOs

no information found

Officers

The officers wore the same uniform as the privates with the following exceptions:

  • tricorne laced gold
  • black neck stock
  • red collar without braid
  • gilt buttons on the coat
  • buttonholes on the left side of the coat are shown edged with gold thread
  • dark shoulder strap with short fringes (left shoulder only)
  • red cuffs without braid but each with 3 gilt buttons
  • no turnbacks
  • no buttons visible on the waistcoat; instead: golden braid along the middle and along the bottom of the waistcoat
  • yellow and black silk sash
  • straight officer's sword in brown leather scabbard with golden tip
  • yellow gloves

Senior officers probably carried sticks identifying their rank:

  • lieutenant: bamboo stick without knob
  • captain: long rush stick with a bone knob
  • major: long rush stick with a silver knob and a small silver chain
  • lieutenant-colonel: long rush stick with a larger silver knob without chain
  • colonel: long rush stick with a golden knob

Musicians

no information found

Second Battalion

Privates

Uniform in 1762 - Source: Frédéric Aubert
Uniform in 1762
as per the Bautzener Handschrift

completed with other sources where necessary
Headgear black unlaced tricorne with dark cockade
Neck&nbs;stock red
Coat dark blue lined white with 6 brass buttons arranged (1-2-3) on each side on the chest
Collar red
Shoulder Straps none visible
Lapels none
Pockets horizontal pockets, each with 3 brass buttons
Cuffs red, each with 3 brass buttons
Turnbacks white
Waistcoat dark blue with 2 rows of small brass buttons and with horizontal pockets, each with 3 brass buttons
Breeches white
Gaiters black
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt n/a
Waistbelt white with a brass buckle
Cartridge Box n/a
Bayonet Scabbard n/a
Scabbard none
Footgear black shoes


Troopers were armed with a musket and a bayonet.

Other interpretations

The Albertina shows the following differences:

  • hat: black tricorne with 3 red pompoms at front and corners; a brass button under the front pompom (fastener not recognizable)
  • neck stock: black
  • coat: turnbacks are fastened with small rectangular red cloth patches

A note on the gaiters: to quote from Angeli: “... except for leather works of red Russian leather; the Stabs-Infanterie had gaiters of grey colour”. This is probably a misprint; the colour of gaiters surely was not used as a differentiating factor. It would be of more import if the Stabs-Dragoner were issued with (grey) gaiters for dismounted duty inside the headquarters.

NCOs

no information found

Officers

The officers wore the same uniform as the privates with the following exceptions:

  • tricorne laced gold with a white and green cockade, and a gilt fastener button
  • black neck stock
  • red collar edged gold
  • red cuffs with two horizontal golden braids
  • no shoulder strap
  • gilt buttons on the coat and waistcoat
  • dark blue breeches
  • no turnbacks
  • yellow and black silk sash
  • straight officer's sword in brown leather scabbard with golden tip
  • yellow gloves

Senior officers probably carried sticks identifying their rank:

  • lieutenant: bamboo stick without knob
  • captain: long rush stick with a bone knob
  • major: long rush stick with a silver knob and a small silver chain
  • lieutenant-colonel: long rush stick with a larger silver knob without chain
  • colonel: long rush stick with a golden knob

Musicians

no information found

Colours

The regiment surely carried flags of the usual pattern. Even its grenadier units must have had flags during honour guard duties.

All German infantry regiments carried identical colours: a white Leibfahne (colonel) and yellow Regimentsfahne. The hand painted colours were made of silk and measured Size 178 cm x 127 cm. The 260 cm long flagpoles had golden finial and were decorated with black and yellow spirals of cloth.

The colonel colour was carried by the first battalion.

Colonel flag (Leibfahne):

  • field: white
  • border: alternating white and yellow outer waved triangles pointing inwards, red and black inner waved triangles pointing outwards
  • obverse (right): the Immaculate Mother of God (which had been declared the patroness of the army by kaiser Ferdinand III) on a cloud, crushing a snake under her foot and surrounded by rays
  • reverse (left): crowned and armed Imperial double-eagle with the "Lothringen-Toscanian" arms on a shield and the initials of the Emperor CF (Corregens Franciscus) on the left wing and IM (Imperator Magnus) on the right
Leibfahne – Source: PMPDel

Regimental flags (Regimentsfahne):

  • field: yellow
  • border: alternating white and yellow outer waved triangles pointing inwards, red and black inner waved triangles pointing outwards
  • obverse (right): crowned and armed Imperial double-eagle with the "Lothringen-Toscanian" arms on a shield and the initials of the Emperor CF (Corregens Franciscus) on the left wing and IM (Imperator Magnus) on the right
  • reverse (left): unarmed and crowned Imperial double-eagle with the arms of Hungaria and Bohemia on a shield and the initials M on the left wing and T on the right
Regimentsfahne – Source: PMPDel

In fact, the situation on the field was slightly more complex than this, since colours were usually replaced only when worn out. It is fairly possible that some regiment who had been issued colours of the 1743 pattern were still carrying them at the beginning of the Seven Years' War. For more details, see Austrian Line Infantry Colours.

References

001 Feldwachen-Reglement in Supplementum Codicis Austriaci, oder Chronologische Sammlung aller... vom 20ten Oktober 1740. als vom Anbeginne der angetretenen glorreichsten Regierung der AllerduchlauchtigstGroßmächtigsten Römischen Kaiserinn zu Hungarn und Böheim Königinn, ... Mar. Theresiae, bis letzten Dezember 1758. ... erlassenen Generalien, Vienna 1777, p. 1239 f
002 Mittheilungen des k.u.k.Kriegs-Archivs - Supplement. Geschichte der K.u.k. Wehrmacht; Vol. 2 (bearbeitet von Alfons Freiherrn von Wrede), Vienna, 1898
003 Grosser Generalstab Kriegsgeschichtliche Abteilung II – Die Kriege Friedrichs des Grossen, Part 3 Der siebenjährige Krieg 1756-1763, Vol. 1, Anlage 4, p.70
004 (Angeli, Moritz von): Zur Geschichte des k.k. Generalstabes, in the newspaper 'Die Vedette', Vienna, in 8 parts, starting from February 25, 1876
005 Zeinar, Hubert: Geschichte des österreichischen Generalstabes, Böhlau Verlag, Vienna, Cologne, Weimar, 2006
006 Generals-Reglement, Vienna, 1769
007 Oestreichische Militärische Zeitschrift, Fünftes Heft, Vienna 1841
008 Brinner, Wilhelm: Geschichte des k.k. Pionnier -Regimentes', Verlag des Regiments, Vienna 1878
009 Thümmler, Lars-Holger: Die österreichische Armee im Siebenjährigen Krieg; Die Bautzener Bilderhandschrift aus dem Jahre 1762, Brandenb. Verlagshaus, Berlin 1993
010 J.F.S.*** (Seyfahrt): Kurzgefaßte Geschichte aller Kaiserlich-Königliche Regimenter..., welche bis auf das Jahr 1762 fortgesetzet, und...; Frankfurt and Leipzig 1762
011 Wiener Zeitung, edition November 11, 1758
012 Augspurgische Ordinari-Post-Zeitung, various editions from February to April 1759
013 Augspurgisches Extra-Blätel, of November 1, 1759
014 Annalen der Österreichischen Armee, Vol. 3 (also: Geschichte der Österreichischen Regimenter, Corps..; Vol. 3), Vienna by Catharina Gräfer, 1812
015 Nachtrag zu den Historischen Nachrichten der Neuern Europäischen Begebenheiten auf das Jahr 1759, Piece XI Stück, des Monats November
016 Tempelhoff, Georg Friedrich: Geschichte des siebenjährigen Krieges in Deutschland zwischen dem ..., Vol 4, Berlin,1789
017 Formanek, Jaromir: Geschichte des k. k. Infanterie-Regiments Nr. 41, Vol. 1, Czernowitz 1886
018 Kessel, Eberhard: Quellen und Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der Schlacht'bei Torgau, Berlin, 1937
019 Friedrich Jihn: Der Feldzug 1760 in Sachsen und Schlesien mit besonderer Berücksichtigung der Schlacht bei Torgau, Vienna 1882
020 Ligne, Charles de: Mon Journal de la guerre de sept ans, Campagne de 1760; Walther, Dresden, 1796
021 Finke, Edmund: Geschichte des k. u. k. ungarischen Infanterie-Regimentes Nr. 37 Erzherzog Joseph, Vol 1, 1896
022 Teutsche Kriegs-Canzley auf das Jahr 1762, Frankfurt, Leipzig, 1762, No. 19
023 Beyträge zur neuern Staats-Und Krieges-Geschichte, Vol 9, Danzig 1760 p. 663


Acknowledgments

Dieter Müller for the initial version of this article