Alt-Daun Infantry

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Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> Austrian Army >> Alt-Daun Infantry

Origin and History

The regiment was raised in 1643 by the Bohemian Estates and taken in the Emperor’s service. During the following years, the regiment recruited in Bohemia and, in peace time, garrisoned Prague, the capital. The proprietor of the regiment was also military governor of Bohemia and commander of the City of Prague.

The successive proprietors of the regiment during the War of the Spanish Succession were:

  • from 1691: Wilhelm Johann Count Daun
  • from 1706: Wenzel Hroznata Count Guttenstein
  • from 1716: Damian Philipp Baron von Sickingen

The successive effective commanders of the regiment during the War of the Spanish Succession were:

  • from 1699: Ferdinand Baron Czeika von Olbramowitz
  • from 1705: Heinrich Reinhard Count Daun
  • from 1708: de Pellet
  • from 1711: Ehrmanns
  • from 1716: Count Nostitz

The regiment was disbanded 1748. Seven companies were incorporated in the Tyrolian-Land-regiment (No. 46), the others in ten different regiments.

Service during the War

In 1701, one battalion of the regiment was sent to Northern Italy. On 1 September, it was supposedly present at the Battle of Chiari but we find no trace of this unit in the order of battle.

In 1703, the same battalion was engaged in South Tyrol.

From 1704 to 1706, one battalion of the regiment campaigned in Hungary. On 28 May, it took part in the Engagement of Smolenitz. It was later stationed on the border of Styria as part of the corps of Hannibal Heister.

In 1709, one battalion was with the Army of the Upper Rhine and took part in the combat of Rumersheim.

In 1710, the same battalion was stationed in Bavaria. It saw no action during the next two years.

In 1713, the same battalion garrisoned Landau.

Uniform

Privates

Uniform in 1710 - Copyright: Richard Couture
Uniform Details as per
Kühn & Hall
Headgear
Fusilier black tricorne laced white; as field sign, green foliage was attached to the tricorne in summer and a wisp of straw in winter

N.B.: to distinguish soldiers (from corporal down to privates) of each company, a button or rosette at the colour of the company was attached to the tricorne.

Grenadier bearskin edged with a white braid; probably a red hanging bag edged with a white braid
Neck stock white
Coat pearl grey with pewter buttons on the right side and 1 pewter button on each side in the small of the back
Collar none
Shoulder Straps none
Lapels none
Pockets horizontal pockets, each with 3 pewter buttons
Cuffs red, each with 3 pewter buttons
Turnbacks none
Waistcoat red
Breeches red
Stockings red fastened under the knee with a natural leather strap
Gaiters made of canvas and used only when the soldier wore linen breeches; in this case, the stockings were replaced by linen socks; the use of gaiters generalized much later
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt natural leather
Waistbelt a yellow deer or buffalo leather waist-belt worn above the waistcoat
Cartridge Pouch red or black leather pouch containing 24 cartridges, a pewter oil flask, two needles attached to a small chain (to clean the touch-hole of the lock), a tube that held the match for lighting the fuse of grenades, with a wooden peg on a small chain and a roll of fuse. The cartridge box had two cover flaps. The top one was sometimes decorated with a metal badge bearing the cipher or the arms of the Inhaber.

Grenadiers carried two cartridge pouches. The first one, slightly larger than that of fusiliers, was worn on wide cross-belt and contained grenades and a pewter tube that held the match for lighting the fuse of grenades; the smaller second pouch was attached to the waist-belt and contained cartridges for the musket.

Bayonet Scabbard black leather
Scabbard none
Footwear Russia leather shoes


Armaments consisted of a musket and a bayonet. Grenadiers were also armed with hand grenades.

NCOs

NCOs carried a spontoon (half-pike). They were also armed with a Stossdegen (a long two-edged estoc or rapier) carried in a black leather scabbard attached to the waist-belt.

NCOs of grenadier companies carried a flintlock musket instead of the spontoon.

NCOs also carried a cane whose characteristics indicated their precise rank. This cane had the length of a walking stick and was carried in and out of service. In action, to free hands, the cane was hanged to a button of the coat.

Grenadier sergeants and fouriers were distinguished from privates by three silver braids on the bag of their bearskin.

Officers

Uniforms of officers were always of finer cloth than those of the privates.

Officers wore a black and yellow silk sash across the chest or around

Musicians

Drummers and fifers wore a very different uniform:

  • a red coat edged with a yellow braid; white cuffs edged yellow with 3 brass buttons; horizontal pockets edged yellow, each with 3 brass buttons
  • buff waistcoat
  • buff breeches
  • white stockings

The drum belt was usually brown and worn on the right shoulder. the waist.

Lieutenants of the grenadier companies were distinguished from privates and NCOs by four golden braids on the bag of their bearskin; captains by five golden braids on their bearskin.

Officers carried a partisan. The partisan was decorated with a tassel: gold for the colonel, gold with silver fringe for the lieutenant-colonel, gold and silken fringe for captains and silken fringe for lieutenants. In some regiments, the captains' tassel was entirely of silk; in this case the lieutenants' partisan had no tassel. The partisans of staff officers had gilt butt caps.

Officers were also armed with a Stossdegen (a long two-edged estoc or rapier) carried in a black leather scabbard attached to the waist-belt.

Officers carried a cane whose characteristics indicated their precise rank. This cane had the length of a walking stick and was carried in and out of service. In action, to free hands, the cane was hanged to a button of the coat.

Officers of grenadier companies carried a flintlock musket instead of the partisan. Captains, lieutenants and sergeants of these companies always had their bayonet affixed to their musket.

In the field, officers carried a pair of pistols.

Musicians

Drummers and fifers wore a very different uniform:

  • a red coat edged with a yellow braid; white cuffs edged yellow with 3 brass buttons; horizontal pockets edged yellow, each with 3 brass buttons
  • buff waistcoat
  • buff breeches
  • white stockings

The drum belt was usually brown and worn on the right shoulder.

Colors

Kühn & Hall depict a Kompaniefahne dated 1709. Its white field was decorated with alternating red and yellow diagonal flames. It was bordered with alternating red, yellow and white flames (white flames pointing inwards, red and yellow flames pointing outwards); centre device consisting of a crowned and armed Imperial double-eagle with the the initials of Emperor Leopold I LI (Leopold Imperator) on its breast.

Kompaniefahne – Copyright: Kronoskaf

References

Wrede, A. v.: Geschichte der K. und K. Wehrmacht, file II. pp. 210ff, Vienna 1898

Kühn/Hall: 'The Imperial Regiments of Foot 1701-1714, Part 21

Acknowledgments

Harald Skala for the initial version of this article