Barfleur (90)

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Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Navies >> British Navy >> Barfleur (90)

Origin and History

The ship was built by Fisher Harding at Deptford Dockyard and launched on 10 August 1697.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the ship was under the command of:

  • in 1701: Captain Thomas Jennings
  • in 1702: Captain Francis Wyvell
  • from 1704: Captain James Stewart
  • from February 1705: Captain Edward Whitaker
  • in 1706: Captain Robert Fairfax

In August 1713, the ship underwent a rebuild and was relaunched on 27 June 1716.

In 1755, the ship was reduced to 80 guns.

In 1764, the ship was hulked and finally broken up in 1783.

Service during the War

In August 1702, the ship was part of the powerful combined fleet assembled for the unsuccessful expedition against Cádiz. On its way home, this fleet captured the largest part of the plate-fleet in the Battle of Vigo Bay where the ship was sent to batter a fort. During the combat, shot pierced her hull and she had her main mast shot away. She lost 2 men killed and 2 wounded. She also recaptured the Dartmouth (50).

On 24 August 1704, the ship fought in the Battle of Málaga.

Characteristics

Technical specifications
Guns 90
Lower gundeck 22 x demi-cannon
Middle gundeck 30 x culverins
Upper gundeck 36 x sakers
Roundhouse 2 x 3-pdrs
Crew 680 men
Length at gundeck 162 ft 10 in (49.64 m)
Width 46 ft 4 in (14.12 m)
Depth 18 ft 2 in (5.54 m)
Displacement 1476 Tons (Builder's Old Measurement)

References

Harrison, Simon and Manuel Blasco, Three Decks - Warships in the Age of Sail

Phillips, M., Michael Phillip's Ships of the Old Navy

Wikipedia

N.B.: the section Service during the War is partly derived from our articles depicting the various campaigns, battles and sieges.