Condé Cavalerie

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Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> French Army >> Condé Cavalerie

Origin and History

This unit is one of the 12 cavalry regiments organised following an order dated 16 May 1635. His first mestre-de-camp was Louis de Bourbon, Duc d’Enghien.

Upon its creation, the regiment was immediately sent to Italy. In 1636, it was recalled to Bourgogne, where it took part in the siege of Dôle. On 30 July of the same year, it was reduced to a single free company.

On 24 January 1638, the regiment was re-established and served in the Pyrenees, where it took part in the siege of Fuenterrabia. It was then sent to Piedmont. In 1640, it was at the siege of Turin. In 1641, it took part in the capture of Ivrea, in the combat of Chivasso, in the capture of Piannezza and Mondovi and in the siege of Coni. In 1642, it was transferred to Roussillon, where it contributed to the reduction of Collioure, Perpignan and Lérida. In 1643, it took part in the affairs of Villalonga, Martorell, Tamarit and Lérida. In 1644, it was sent to Germany, where it took part in the combat of Freiburg, Philippsburg, Mainz and Landau. In 1645, it participated in the battles of Marienthal and Nordlingen, in the capture of Heilbronn and Trier, and in the siege of Dunkerque.

On 26 December 1646, the regiment took the name of “Condé”, which it would retain throughout the Ancien Régime.

In 1647, the regiment returned to Catalonia and was at the second siege of Lérida.. Recalled to Paris in 1649, the regiment then followed its mestre-de-camp and joined the Fronde. It was officially disbanded on 20 January 1650, but continued to fight against royal troops.

On 26 February 1651, the regiment was re-established but soon disbanded on 13 September. It then campaigned in the Spanish service for several years.

On 7 November 1659, the regiment re-integrated the French service. It garrisoned various places in Picardie. On 18 April 1661, it was reduced to a single company.

On 7 December 1665, the regiment was re-established to its full strength. In 1667, it took part in the capture of Tournai, Douai and Lille; in 1668, in the capture of Baccarat and Rambervillers. On 24 May 1668, it was once more reduced to a single company.

On 9 August 1671, the regiment was re-established and was never reduced or disbanded afterwards during the Ancien Régime.

In 1672, at the outbreak of the Franco-Dutch War (1672-78), the regiment campaigned in Holland. In 1673, it took part in the siege of Maastricht; in 1674, in the Battle of Séneffe; in 1675, in the capture of Dinant, Huy and Limbourg; in 1676, in the campaign on the Sarre River; and in 1677, in the Battle of Kochersberg.

In 1682, the regiment was at the camp of Artois; and in 1683, at the camp of the Saône.

In 1684, the regiment formed part of the Army of Roussillon and was present at the Combat of the Ter and at the siege of Girona.

From 1685 to 1687, the regiment was at the camp of the Adour.

In 1688, at the outbreak of the Nine Years' War (1688-97), the regiment joined the Army of Flanders. In 1690, it took part in the Battle of Fleurus; and in 1693, in the Battle of Landen and in the siege of Ath.

At the beginning of the War of the Spanish Succession, the regiment counted two squadrons.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the successive nominal commander of the regiment were:

  • from 11 December 1686: Henri Jules de Bourbon-Condé
  • from 15 September 1709: Louis Henri de Bourbon-Condé, Duc de Bourbon
  • from 1 April 1710 to 21 February 1740: Louis Henri de Bourbon-Condé, 2nd Duc de Bourbon

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the successive mestres de camp lieutenant of the regiment were:

  • from 7 February 1694: Marquis de Cérisy
  • from 23 March 1705 to 1715: N. de Rochechouart, Marquis de Montpipeau

Service during the War

In 1701, the regiment served with the Army of Flanders. By October, it was stationed in Roermond.

In April 1702, the regiment was stationed in Upper Guelderland. On 10 June, it was at the combat of Nijmegen. It was then transferred to the Army of the Rhine. In September, it was allocated to Villars’s Army, which was destined to join the Bavarian Army. On 14 October, the regiment was present at the Battle of Friedlingen. By the end of December, the regiment was stationed in Toul.

In February and March 1703, the regiment took part in the Siege of Kehl. On 31 July, it fought in the Combat of Munderkingen, where it lost a standard. On 20 September, it fought in the Battle of Höchstädt.

On 13 August 1704, the regiment fought in the disastrous Battle of Blenheim. It was then sent back to Flanders.

At the end of 1705, the regiment returned to the Rhine.

In 1706, the regiment was transferred to Flanders.

In 1708, the regiment returned to Germany.

From 1709 to 1712, it campaigned in Flanders.

In 1713, the regiment took part in the campaign on the Rhine.

Uniform

no information found

Standards

Regimental standards (4 silken standards): embroidered and fringed in silver;

  • obverse: blue field; centre device consisting of a golden royal sun surmounted by a scroll bearing the royal motto “Nec Pluribus Impar” in gold
  • reverse: ventre de biche (reddish orange white) field; centre device consisting of a silver sun kindling a pyre in the open field surmounted by a scroll bearing the motto “Da materiam splendescam”
Tentative Reconstruction
Regimental Standard - Copyright: Kronoskaf

References

This article incorporates texts from the following books which are now in the public domain:

  • Susane, Louis: Histoire de la cavalerie française, Vol. 2, J. Hetzel et Cie, Paris, 1874, pp. 365-375
  • Pajol, Charles P. V.: Les Guerres sous Louis XV, vol. VII, Paris, 1891, p. 354-355

Other sources

Funcken, L. and F., Les uniformes de la guerre en dentelle