Guardia de Nápoles

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Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> Spanish Army (Bourbon) >> Guardia de Nápoles

Origin and History

Historically, the Viceroy of Naples had a company of lancer to escort him during public ceremonies.

In 1691, the Count de Santisteban disbanded this company to replace it with two companies of cuirassiers of 50 men each.

At the outbreak of the War of the Spanish Succession, in 1701, these companies each had 7 officers and, respectively, 61 and 51 guards. Their strength would regularly increase until 1707.

Similarly, the Captain_general and the Governor of Arms were both at the head of a company of guards.

In March 1705, these four companies of guards were amalgamated to form a regiment designated as “Corazas de la Guardia de Corps”, also known as the “Corazas de Oléa”.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the commanders of these companies were:

  • for the 1st company of the Viceroy
    • in 1701: Fray Ventura Sarracini
    • from December 1701: Francisco Emperat
    • from 1 March 1702 until 1707: Baltasar Cortès Carrillo
  • for the 2nd company of the Viceroy
    • in 1701: Domenico di Sandro
    • from 1 March 1702 to 1707: Diego Bauzo Juarez

From the creation of the regiment in March 1705, to its disbandment in July 1707, its colonel was Domingo Garate y Oléa.

Service during the War

By 1703, the Captain-General's Company counted 8 officers and 49 men; and the Governor of Arm's Company, under Captain Karl Grünenberg, had 6 officers and 57 men.

By 1704, the first company of the Viceroy counted 10 officers and 78 men; while the second had 9 officers and 69 men.

In March 1705, these four companies of guards were amalgamated to form a regiment designated as “Corazas de la Guardia de Corps”, also known as the “Corazas de Oléa”. By August, the regiment had been increased and counted 12 companies for a total of 113 officers and 257 troopers.

Between 9 and 16 July 1707, the regiment was taken prisoners by the Imperialists in Naples and disbanded.

Uniform

Very little is known about the uniform of this regiment to the exception that the uniform was blue with red as its distinctive colour. We don't know the “metal colour” of the regiment.

Officers

Uniforms of officers differed from those of privates and NCOs by the finer material used. Their waistcoat, saddle cloth and housings were edged with a wide golden braid. They always wore a tricorne notwithstanding the headgear worn by soldiers.

The regulation of 30 December 1704 specified the distinctive of each military rank:

  • colonel: a baton with a gold knob
  • lieutenant-colonel: a baton with a silver knob
  • sargento mayor: a baton with a silver topped knob
  • captain: silver or golden epaulettes (according to the metal colour of the regiment) on both shoulders
  • lieutenant: silver or golden epaulette (according to the metal colour of the regiment) on the right shoulder
  • cornet: silver or golden epaulette (according to the metal colour of the regiment) on the left shoulder

NCOs

The regulation of 30 December 1704 specified the distinctive of each military rank:

  • sergeant : baton without knob and halberd
  • mariscal de logis (quartermaster): small woolen epaulette (red or of the distinctive colour of the regiment)
  • brigadier: swagger stick
  • corporal of squadron: swagger stick
  • second corporal of squadron (rank suppressed in 1706): swagger stick

Standards

no information found yet

References

Dragonas Magazine

Acknowledgement

Jean-Pierre Loriot for the initial version of this article.