Lottum Infantry

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Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> Prussian Army >> Lottum Infantry

Origin and History

By a decree issued on 1 August 1688 by the Elector of Brandenburg, a new regiment was raised in Wesel by Colonel Carl Philipp Baron von Wylich zu Lottum. It was initially formed with eight companies taken from Varenne Infantry and by and from Holstein-Beck Infantry. A third of the regiment consisted of Huguenot refugees from France.

In 1689, during the Nine Years' War (1688-97), the first battalion (5 companies) of the regiment campaigned on the Rhine. In 1691, this battalion campaigned in Flanders and was present at the actions of Ghent, Ath and Namur. In 1693, it fought in the Battle of Landen.

Meanwhile, the second battalion served in Hungary in 1691 and 1692. In 1691, it took part in the Battle of Slankamen; in 1694, in the Siege of Peterwardein; and in 1697, in the Battle of Zenta.

Did you know that...
Philipp Karl Reichsgraf von Wylich und Lottum was born on 27 August 1650. Between 1670 and 1679, he fought against the French in the Netherlands and on Rhine. In 1694, he was promoted to lieutenant-general and Chef of the present regiment. On 20 January 1701, he was elevated to the title of count.

Since November 1702, the Count zu Lottum was commander of all Prussian troops in Dutch pay. On 27 February 1719, the Count von Lottum was promoted to field marshal by King Friedrich Wilhelm I. Philipp Karl died on 14 February 1719.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the regimental Chef was:

  • from 1688: Carl Philipp Count von Wylich zu Lottum

After the War of the Spanish Succession, the regiment returned to its garrison places in Prussia.

The numbering system (Stammliste) was first used by Leopold I., Fürst von Anhalt-Dessau (Der alte Dessauer) in the Dessauer Spezifikation from 1737. Around 1780 the numbers were used in the printed Stammlisten, still with some variations for the fusilier regiments. It became official by "Cabinets-Ordre" from October 1, 1806. The present infantry regiment was attributed number 15.

When Frederick II ascended to the throne on 1 June 1740, the regiment was transformed into the "Regiment Garde". By 4 August 1740, the first battalion in Ruppin was designated as the "Leibgarde", while the second, in Nauen, was completed with companies from the former Grenadier-Garde and formed the new “Prinz Ferdinand von Preussen Infanterie Regiment”.

Service during the War

From April to June 1702, one battalion of the regiment took part in the Siege of Kaiserswerth. In October, the regiment took part in the Siege of Rheinberg.

In 1703, the regiment remained before Rheinberg until its capitulation in February, From October to December, it took part in the Siege of Geldern.

By 19 May 1704, one battalion of the regiment was posted at Rottweil as part of the army of the Margrave of Baden. On 13 August, the regiment took part in the resounding victory at the Battle of Blenheim. From September to November, it was at the Siege of Landau.

From 25 September and 5 October 1705, a battalion of the regiment took part in the Siege of Haguenau.

In August 1706, the same battalion took part in the Siege of Menin.

In 1707, the regiment was assigned to Marlborough’s Army in the Netherlands, but saw no action.

On 11 July 1708, the regiment took part in the Battle of Oudenarde, where it played an important role in the decisive attack on the right wing of the Allies. On 28 September, it was at the Engagement of Wijnendale.

On 11 September 1709, the regiment fought in the Battle of Malplaquet. In September and October, it took part in the Siege of Mons.

In April and May 1710, the regiment took part in the Siege of Douai. From 15 July to 29 August, it was at the Siege of Béthune. In September, it was present at the Siege of Saint-Venant. From September to November, it took part in the Siege of Aire-sur-la-Lys.

In August and September 1711, the regiment took part in the Siege of Bouchain.

In July and August 1712, the regiment took part in the failed Siege of Landrecies.

Uniforms

From 1700, each Prussian unit started to wear a distinguishing uniform. A regulation was issued in 1709 to standardize the uniform and equipment.

Musicians

To do

Colours

To do

References

Reinhard, K.: Geschichte des Königlich Preussischen Ersten Garde-Regiments zu Fuß, Potsdam 1858

Nelke, Reinhard: Preussen

N.B.: the section Service during the War is partly derived from our articles depicting the various campaigns, battles and sieges.

Acknowledgegent

Harald Skala for the initial version of this article