Mahony Dragoons

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Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> Spanish Army (Bourbon) >> Mahony Dragoons

Origin and History

The regiment was created by a royal decree issued on 17 June 1703, as the Regimiento de dragones irlandeses”. On 17 December 1703, the regiment was reviewed for the first time. On 26 January 1704, Daniel O'Mahony1 was appointed colonel of the regiment who took his name. By 4 March 1704, the regiment had completed its recruitmen among Irishmen exiled during the Nine Years' War (1688–97).

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the owner of the regiment was:

  • from 26 January 1704: Daniel O'Mahony

In 1715, the regiment became “Edimburgo Dragones”.

Service during the War

In March 1704, now complete, the regiment was sent to the Estremadura.

In 1706, the regiment was at the siege of Alicante and at the defence of Cartagena.

In 1707, the regiment took part in the campaign in Portugal. On 25 April, it fought in the Battle of Almansa and later in an action at Alzira.

In January 1708, the regiment took part in the defence of Alcoy.

In 1710, the regiment took part in an action near Talavera. On 20 August, it fought in the Battle of Saragossa.

Uniform

Troopers

Uniform in 1706 - Copyright: Michele Savasta Fiore
Uniform Details as per Emilio Marin Ferrer and Michele Savasta Fiore
Headgear Troopers: black tricorne laced silver with a red cockade

Grenadiers: dragoon mitre cap with a yellow front flap edged silver and a red cap with an yellow pompom

Neck stock white cravate
Coat red with pewter buttons on the right side
Collar none
Shoulder straps yellow aiguillette on the right shoulder
Lapels none
Pockets horizontal pockets, each with 3 pewter buttons
Cuffs yellow, each with 3 pewter buttons and 4 white laced buttonholes
Turnbacks none
Waistcoat yellow with pewter buttons
Breeches yellow (probably buff leather during campaign)
Leather Equipment
Bandolier natural leather
Waistbelt natural leather worn above the coat (white leather for grenadiers)
Cartridge Box natural leather ventral cartridge box
Scabbard black leather with a white metal tip
Footgear natural leather gaiters
Horse Furniture
Saddlecloth red edged yellow
Housings red edged yellow with the silver monogram of Philip V
Blanket roll yellow and red


Grenadier Uniform in 1706 - Copyright: Michele Savasta Fiore


Troopers were armed with a sword, two pistols and a carbine.

Officers

Officers wore uniforms with the following peculiarities:

  • black tricorne bordered with a white plumetis
  • cuffs and pockets edged with a silver braid
  • waistcoat edged with a silver braid
  • a white sash usually worn around the waist over the coat

Uniforms of officers differed from those of privates and NCOs by the finer material used. Their waistcoat, saddle cloth and housings were edged with a wide golden braid.

The regulation of 30 December 1704 specified the distinctive of each military rank:

  • colonel: a baton with a gold knob
  • lieutenant-colonel: a baton with a silver knob
  • sargento mayor: a baton with a silver topped knob
  • captain: silver or golden epaulettes (according to the metal colour of the regiment) on both shoulders
  • lieutenant: silver or golden epaulette (according to the metal colour of the regiment) on the right shoulder
  • cornet: silver or golden epaulette (according to the metal colour of the regiment) on the left shoulder

NCOs

The regulation of 30 December 1704 specified the distinctive of each military rank:

  • sergeant : baton without knob and halberd
  • mariscal de logis (quartermaster): small white woolen epaulette
  • brigadier: swagger stick
  • corporal of squadron: swagger stick
  • second corporal of squadron (rank suppressed in 1706): swagger stick

Musicians

Drummers wore a “reversed colours” uniform: yellow coat with red distinctive. The flagpole was coral-pink and carried two silk and silver cords.

Guidons

All Irish dragoon regiments in the Spanish service carried the same generic Colonela Guidon depicted below.

Ordonnance guidons: 4 crimson guidons made of satin and embroidered in silver and gold; the arms of Spain on one side and the regimental badge on the other.

Colonela Guidon - Copyright: Michele Savasta Fiore using a template contributed by Gilbert Noury
Ordonnance Guidon - Copyright: Michele Savasta Fiore using a template contributed by Gilbert Noury

Footnotes

1 Daniel O'Mahony was born in Dermond. In 1689, it left for France where he served as major in Dillon Regiment. On 1 February 1702, it distinguished himself during the failed storming of Cremona by the Imperialists. He later accompanied King Philip V when he returned to Spain. In 1706, Mahony became count. In 1707, he was promoted to major-general and as such commanded the Spanish army operating in Sicily. In 1708, Mahony was promoted to lieutenant-general. He died on 2 January 1714.

References

Boletin de la Agrupacion de Miniaturistas Militares de España

Dragonas Magazine

Acknowledgment

Jean-Pierre Loriot for the initial version of this article.