Maulevrier Infanterie

From Project WSS
Jump to navigationJump to search

Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> French Army >> Maulevrier Infanterie

Origin and History

The regiment was created on November 15, 1674 from the militia of Languedoc by the Maréchal de Schomberg. The unit would remain a gentleman’s regiment until December 1762, being known by the names of its successive colonels.

In 1675, during the Franco-Dutch War (1672-78), the regiment took part in the capture of Figueres, in the attack of Girona and in the submission of Ampurias, Bellegarde and Castle La Chapelle. In 1676, the regiment was transferred to Sicily. In 1678, it returned to Catalonia.

In 1684, the regiment took part in the Battle of the Ter River, in the assault of Girona and in the investment of Quiers.

In 1690, during the Nine Years' War (1688-97), the regiment took part in the capture of Sant Joan de les Abadesses and Ripoll, and in the blockade of Girona; in 1691, in the conquest of the County of Nice. In 1692, it was transferred to Flanders where it fought in the Battle of Steenkerque. In 1693, it took part in the Battle of Landen. At the beginning of 1695, the regiment received a second battalion. The same year, it took part in the unsuccessful defence of Namur.

By the time of the War of the Spanish Succession, the regiment counted two battalions.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the regiment was commanded by:

  • from 16 September 1695: Henri Robert, Chevalier de Maulevrier
  • from February 1706: Pierre Le Normand du Fort
  • from 29 November 1710 to 1 February 1723: Charles Hugues de Lyonne

The second battalion was disbanded in 1715.

Service during the War

In 1701, the two battalions of the regiment served in Italy. On 1 September, it took part in the Battle of Chiari where it was deployed in Bouligneux's Brigade on the infantry right wing and covered the retreat of Limousin Infanterie. The regiment then took up its winter-quarters at Caneto on the Oglio. On 1 December, Prince Eugène de Savoie invested Caneto. After the siege and capture of Caneto, the remnants of the regiment (5 officers and 300 men) became prisoners of war and transferred to Trento.

Towards the end of August 1702, the regiment was exchanged and placed in garrison in Mantua. In December, its grenadiers contributed to the capture of Governolo.

In January 1703, the regiment took part in the combat of Stradella. On 11 January, it fought in the combat of Castelnuovo di Bormida. From July to September, it participated in Vendôme’s offensive in South Tyrol.

In 1704, the regiment served in the siege of Vercelli, Ivrea and Siege of Verrua. On 26 December, it repulsed a sortie of the garrison of Verrua.

In 1705, after a quick rest at Medoli, the regiment took part in the capture of Chivasso and Socino.

On 19 April 1706, the regiment, now known as Du Fort, fought in the Battle of Calcinato where it was deployed in Grancey’s Brigade. It then took part in the siege of Turin. On 8 September, it fought in the Battle of Castiglione before returning to France.

At the beginning of 1707, the regiment was sent to Spain. On 25 April, it fought in the Battle of Almansa. In October, it was in front of Lérida which surrendered on 11 November. It was then sent, along with Maine Infanterie to the Kingdom of Valencia to take the place of Morella which opened its gates on December 15.

In 1708, the regiment contributed to the submission of several towns, including Tortosa. In the night of 30 June to 1 July, it repulsed a sortie of the garrison of Tortosa. An aide-major of the regiment was killed in this affair.

In 1709, the regiment served in Spain till the end of the year, when it was sent to Dauphin/.

In 1710, the regiment was transferred to the Army of Flanders and thrown into Aire which he had to defend.

In 1711, under the name of Lyonne Infanterie, the regiment was brigaded with Royal Roussillon Infanterie and fought in the Combat of Arleux.

On 24 July 1712, the regiment took part in the Battle of Denain. From August to September, it contributed to the recapture of Douai and then to the recapture of Le Quesnoy and Bouchain.

In 1713, the regiment remained in Flanders.

Uniform

To do

Colours

Colonel Colour - Copyright: Kronoskaf
Ordonnance Colour - Copyright: Kronoskaf

References

This article incorporates texts from the following books which are now in the public domain: Susane, Louis: Histoire de l'ancienne infanterie française, J. Corréard, Paris, 1849-1856, Tome 7, pp. 17-23