Portmore Infantry

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Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> Dutch Army >> Portmore Infantry

Origin and History

This regiment was raised on 11 March 1688 by John Wauchaupe.

In 1701, the regiment was transferred to the Dutch service.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the successive colonels of the regiment were:

  • from 31 December 1688: David Colyear, Earl of Portmore (appointed colonel of the British Queen Dowager's Foot on 27 February 1703)
  • from 27 February 1703: vacant
  • from October 1704: John Dalrymple, Viscount (later earl) of Stair (became colonel of the Cameronians in January 1706)
  • from January 1706: John Borthwick
  • from 1706: John Hepburn
  • from 1709 to 1717: James Douglas

The regiment was disbanded in 1717.

Service during the War

By 7 July 1702, the regiment formed part of the Allied army encamped at Nijmegen.

From April to June 1702, the regiment took part in the Siege of Kaiserswerth, where it suffered the highest losses of all: 100 dead and 168 wounded. By 7 July, the regiment formed part of the Allied army encamped at Nijmegen. By 21 December, it was quartered in Bois-le-Duc ('s-Hertogenbosch).

In early 1703, the regiment was part of the garrison of Tongres (Tongeren). In May, it took part in the defence of Tongres and had to surrender as prisoners of war. On October, it was exchanged. By December, it was quartered in Berg-op-Zoom.

On 23 May 1706, the regiment took part in the Battle of Ramillies.

On 11 July 1708, the regiment took part in the Battle of Oudenarde. On 28 September, it fought in the Engagement of Wijnendale.

On 11 September 1709, the regiment fought in the Battle of Malplaquet.

In July and August 1710, the regiment took part in the siege and capture of Béthune

On 24 July 1712, the regiment fought in the Battle of Denain. In September, the regiment took part in the defence of Le Quesnoy and was forced to surrender as prisoners of war.

Uniform

Privates

Uniform Details in 1705 as per Ferguson
Headgear
Fusilier from 1705: fusilier cap with its front decorated with the rock crest, with the motto "Firme" and the lion supporters of the House of Stair
Grenadier from 1705: grenadier cap with its front decorated with the rock crest, with the motto "Firme" and the lion supporters of the House of Stair, it was also decorated with a grenade and gun in red and blue

from 1709: grenadier cap with its front decorated with the knot of union, the sheaf of arms and lion of the Dutch arms, a hand with a curved sword, a horse at the amble, guns and grenades and "shables" of steel and the letters I. and H. for the colonel's name

Neck stock white
Coat scarlet with yellow lining and with buttons on the right side
Collar none
Shoulder Straps none
Lapels none
Pockets no information found, probably horizontal pockets, each with 3 buttons
Cuffs yellow with buttons
Turnbacks none (it seems that the basques of the coat could be turned back if needed but this was a rare practice during this period)
Waistcoat no information found
Breeches no information found
Stockings no information found
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt natural leather
Waistbelt natural leather, worn above the coat
Cartridge Pouch natural leather
Bayonet Scabbard natural leather
Scabbard natural leather
Footwear black shoes fastened with a strap and buckle


Armaments consisted of a musket and a bayonet; and a sword.

NCOs

no information available

Officers

Officers wore a uniform similar to the one of the rank and file but of a better quality.

Musicians

no information available

In 1709 Colonel Hepburn's coat of arms was depicted on the drums and also "the bloody heart and the crown, which Douglas obtained for his coat of arms".

Colours

Tentative Reconstruction
Regimental Colour - Copyright: Kronoskaf

References

Dalton, Charles (ed.): English Army List and Commission Registers, Vol. IV. p. 7

Ferguson, James (ed.): The Scots Brigade in the service of the United Netherlands, 1572-1782, Edinbugh 1901, pp. 307-577

Field, C.: Notes upon Uniform Dress as Worn by the Scots Brigade in Dutch service, in Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research, Vol. 1 No.3 March 1922, p. 93

N.B.: the section Service during the War is mostly derived from our articles depicting the various campaigns, battles and sieges.

Acknowledgement

Jörg Meier for the initial version of this article

Phil Carrington for his work on the lineage of Dutch regiments