Regimiento de Toro

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Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> Spanish Army (Bourbon) >> Regimiento de Toro

Origin and History

For the origin and history of this regiment, please refer to its parent unit, the Tercio Provincial Nuevo de Segovia (aka Tercio de los Blancos).

On 28 February 1707, the two battalions of the Tercio Provincial Nuevo de Segovia became two distinct regiments: the first battalion becoming the “Regimiento de Segovia” (see our article on the Regimiento de Segovia for the history of this new unit); the second, the “Regimiento de Toro” (the object of the present article).

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the tercio was under the command of:

  • from 28 February 1707: Don Diego Antonio Manrique

In 1716, the regiment was incorporated, as second battalion, into the former Tercio del Prince de Ligny who adopted the name of “Regimiento de Toro”.

Service during the War

For the service of this regiment prior to 1707, please refer to its parent unit, the Tercio Provincial Nuevo de Segovia (aka Tercio de los Blancos).

On 28 February 1707, the two battalions of the Tercio Provincial Nuevo de Segovia became two distinct regiments: the first battalion becoming the “Regimiento de Segovia” (see our article on the Regimiento de Segovia for the history of this unit); the second, the new “Regimiento de Toro” (the object of the present article). On 3 May, the new regiment joined the division of Brigadier Don Antonio Montenegro destined to garrison the frontier of Portugal. On 5 May, the regiment marched to Salamanca. Lieutenant-General Marquis de Bay then ordered it to canton at Saelices to contain the advance of the Portuguese. It then took part in the siege of Ciudad-Rodrigo. On 22 May, it participated in the general attack and made itself master of the Convent of San Francisco. After the reconquest of Ciudad-Rodrigo, the regiment rejoined Montenegro's Division. On 5 November, it passed the ford of San Martin del Agueda, penetrated into Portugal and attacked the garrison on Escallon who took refuge in the castle. Its detachment, including some cavalry, then advanced against the garrison of San Felices.

In 1708, the regiment was posted on the frontier with Portugal.

In 1709, the regiment was ordered to relieve the place of Carvajales.

At the beginning of 1710, the regiment was ordered to join the Army of Catalonia. However, the king was forced to send eight battalions (including this regiment) back from Saragossa to the frontier of Portugal which had been too seriously neglected. The regiment took part in an offensive who drove the Allies back to Miranda do Douro. On 29 April, it joined the Army of Extremadura. On 12 September, a second battalion was added to the regiment.

In 1711, the regiment was part of the army of the Marquis de Bay who, on 25 April, encircled Evora and ravaged the Alentejo, razing the camps of Elvas and Campomayor. The regiment was at the bombardment of Elvas and at the sack of Borba where it attacked 200 grenadiers guarding a large quantity of cattle and grain. On 15 June, it rejoined the main army who retreated. The regiment was posted on the Caya.

In September 1712, the regiment accompanied the army in its advance on Campomayor. On 28 September, it opened the trench in front of this place. But during the peace negotiations, it retired to Plasencia.

In 1713, the regiment was transferred from Extremadura to Andalusia where it embarked at Algeciras to reinforce the place of Ceuta on the coast of North Africa, threatened by the Moors. On 27 June and 29 June, it took part in sorties where it suffered heavy losses.

Uniform

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Privates

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Officers

Uniforms of officers differed from those of privates and NCOs by the finer material used. Their waistcoat, saddle cloth and housings were edged with a wide golden braid.

In the infantry, officers wore a silver or gold gorget and a spontoon.

The regulation of 30 December 1704 specified the distinctive of each military rank:

  • colonel: a baton with a gold knob
  • lieutenant-colonel: a baton with a silver knob
  • sargento mayor: a baton with a silver topped knob
  • captain: baton as worn under the reign of the Habsburg
  • lieutenant: baton as worn under the reign of the Habsburg
  • sub-lieutenant: baton with a horn band and a silver ring

NCOs

The regulation of 30 December 1704 specified the distinctive of each military rank:

  • sergeant : baton without knob and halberd
  • mariscal de logis (quartermaster): small white woolen epaulette
  • brigadier: swagger stick
  • corporal of squadron: swagger stick
  • second corporal of squadron (rank suppressed in 1706): swagger stick

Musicians

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Colours

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References

This article is mostly made of abridged and adapted excerpts from the following books which are now in the public domain:

  • Clonard, Conde de, Historia Orgánica de las Armas de Infantería y Caballería, vol. X, Madrid, 1851-62, pp. 199-211