Schlabrendorff Infantry

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Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> Prussian Army >> Schlabrendorff Infantry

Origin and History

In August 1680, Major-General von Pöllnitz formed in Lippstadt a “Free Company” with troops who were garrisoning Minden since 1646. This unit was designated as the “Pöllnitz Squadron”, in fact a battalion, and numbered 750 men.

At the end of 1694, during the Nine Years' War (1688-97), the regiment received a second battalion from the disbanded Alt-Holstein Infanterie Regiment. In 1697, the regiment was reduced.

In 1702, during the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-13), the regiment was brought back to full strength with companies contributed by Anhalt Infantry, Heyden Infantry and Kanitz Infantry.

Since the War of the Spanish Succession, the successive regimental Chefs were:

  • from 1694: Major-General Otto von Schlabrendorff
  • from 1703: David Adolph von Wulffen (killed in the Battle of the Schellenberg)
  • from 1704: Colonel Rudolf Friedrich von Lattorff (killed in the Battle of Oudenarde)
  • from 1713: Major-General Etienne (Stephan) du Trossel (died in 1714)
  • from 1714: Colonel Johann Sigismund Baron von Heyden

After the War of the Spanish Succession, one battalion of the regiment garrisoned Magdeburg, while the other one crossed the Peene and Swine rivers and took part in the landing on Rügen Island.

The numbering system (Stammliste) was first used by Leopold I., Fürst von Anhalt-Dessau (Der alte Dessauer) in the Dessauer Spezifikation from 1737. Around 1780 the numbers were used in the printed Stammlisten, still with some variations for the fusilier regiments. It became official by "Cabinets-Ordre" from October 1, 1806. The present infantry regiment was attributed number 9.

Service during the War

In 1701, one battalion of the regiment formed part of the Prussian Contingent subsidized jointly by the Dutch Republic and Great Britain. It would serve in this contingent until 1713.

From April to June 1702, one battalion of the regiment took part in the Siege of Kaiserswerth. From 24 October, as part of Lottum’s Corps, the regiment was at the Siege of Rheinberg. The siege was soon transformed into a blockade.

On 7 February 1703, Rheinberg finally capitulated. At the end of March, fearing for the Army of the Margrave of Baden posted on the Rhine, the Allies sent a reinforcement (including one battalion of the present regiment) under Lieutenant-General von Goor. On 20 September, the regiment took part in Battle of Höchstädt.

In March 1704, a battalion (565 men) of the regiment was posted in the Black Forest. By 19 May, it was part of the army assembled at Rottweil to oppose the Bavarians. On 13 August, the battalion took part in the Battle of Blenheim.

In 1706, one battalion of the regiment campaigned in Italy. On 99 April, it fought in the Battle of Calcinato. On 8 September, it took part in the Battle of Turin. Meanwhile, another battalion was campaigning in the Low Countries. On 23 May, it was present at the Battle of Ramillies. In September, it took part in the Siege of Ath.

In July and August 1707, one battalion of the regiment took part in the unsuccessful Siege of Toulon.

On 11 July 1708, the regiment was present at the Battle of Oudenarde.

On 11 September 1709, the regiment fought in the Battle of Malplaquet.

By July 1712, one battalion of the regiment formed part of the Allied army in the Low Countries.

Uniforms

From 1700, each Prussian unit started to wear a distinguishing uniform. A regulation was issued in 1709 to standardize the uniform and equipment.

Colours

To do

References

Wikipedia German Edition – Altpreußisches Infanterieregiment No. 9 (1806)

Nelke, Reinhard: Preussen

N.B.: the section Service during the War is partly derived from our articles depicting the various campaigns, battles and sieges.

Acknowledgegent

Harald Skala for the initial version of this article