Schulenburg Dragoons

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Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> Hanoverian Army >> Schulenburg Dragoons

Origin and History

The regiment was raised in the spring of 1701 by Brigadier Alexander von der Schulenburg in Göttingen. He was seconded by Lieutenant-General von Zerssen and Major von Grothe. Recruitment proceeded speedily and by the end of summer, the regiment was mustered at Rotenkirch. It comprised six companies organized in three squadrons.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the successive regimental Chefs were:

  • from 1701: Brigadier Alexander von der Schulenburg (promoted to major-general in 1703, and removed to the former Noyelle Cavalry in 1704)
  • from 1704: Colonel von dem Busche (retired in 1704)
  • from 1704: Colonel von Bennigsten (died of illness in Bruxelles in 1707)
  • from 1707: Colonel von Eltz (died of the wounds received at the Battle of Oudenarde in Bruxelles in 1709)
  • from 1710: Major-General von Schlüter (removed to the former Croix de Fréchapelle Cavalry in 1711)
  • from 1711 to 1715: Colonel Moritz Chalon (aka von Gehlen, died in 1715 as brigadier)

Service during the War

In March 1702, the regiment took part in the invasion of the Duchy of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, in the capture of the militia, and of the town of Peina and Goslar, and in the blockade of Braunschweig and Wolfenbüttel. The regiment then marched to Brabant where the Allied army was assembling at Breda under Marlborough. The regiment took part in the engagement of the Mocker Heath. On August 3, it was at the cannonade of Peer. It later took up its winter-quarters along the Meuse in the region of Roermond.

In 1703, the regiment took part in the capture of Bonn. It was then brigaded with the newly raised Schmettau Dragoons supplied by Anspach-Bayreuth to the Dutch army. This brigade was attached to Obdam’s Corps which, on June 30, was defeated in the Battle of Ekeren. During the retreat the regiment formed part of the rearguard. Brigadier von der Schulenburg, the chief of the regiment, forced a dam occupied by the enemy with his men, thus allowing the Allied army to retreat. For his conduct, he was promoted to major-general. On 15 November, the regiment took part in the Combat of Speyerbach where it was deployed on the right wing. That wing put the French cavalry let wing to flight, capturing 19 standards and two pairs of kettle-drums; the regiment itself capturing three standards. The Allied cavalry was then exposed to the fire of the French infantry. During the retreat, the regiment formed part of the rearguard. The regiment took up its winter-quarters in the Westerwald.

From May 1704, the regiment took part in Marlborough's march to the Danube. On 2 July, it fought in the Battle of Schellenberg. In the night of 2 to 3 July, the regiment suffered heavy losses when a bomb fell on a powder magazine in Donauworth; the companies of Grote and Adelepsen were virtually annihilated. For the rest of the campaign, the regiment could field only two squadrons. On 13 August, it fought in the Battle of Blenheim where it distinguished itself, fighting the Gens d’Armes and a cuirassier regiment (capturing its standards and a pair of kettle-drums). Along with the Anspacher Schmettau Dragoons, the regiment obtained the surrender of five infantry battalions, capturing their five colours. Once more, the regiment suffered heavily in this victorious battle, most of its officers were wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel von Zerssen, Major von Reck and Ensign Hesse were killed; and Colonel von der Schulenburg, wounded. In September, the regiment took part in the siege and capture of Landau. It then took up its winter-quarters on the Moselle at Hundesrück.

During the winter of 1704-05, the regiment was brought back to full strength.

In 1705, the regiment campaigned under Marlborough; first on the Moselle and later in Brabant. On 18 July, it took part in the passage of the French lines at Elixheim. It spent winter in the suburbs of Liège.

On 23 May 1706, the regiment was at the Battle of Ramillies where it was deployed on the right wing. It was not involved in combat. It once more spent winter in the suburbs of Liège.

In 1707, the regiment campaigned in Brabant under Marlborough. It took up its winter-quarters in Bruxelles.

On 11 July 1708, the regiment took part in the Battle of Oudenarde where it lost 10 men and 31 horses killed, and his chief, Colonel von Eltz wounded (he would die of his wound in 1709) as well as Captain-Lieutenant Harling, Lieutenant Podevils, 20 men and 13 horses. The regiment then took part in the siege of Lille. On 28 September, two of its squadrons were at the engagement of Wijnendale. The regiment took up its winter-quarters in Maastricht.

On 11 September 1709, the regiment took part in the Battle of Malplaquet where its “Leibeskadron”, which was part of the vanguard, suffered heavy losses (approx. 50%). In this sanguinary battle, the regiment lost Ensign Harling killed; Captain Haacke, Captain-Lieutenant Harling, Lieutenants Schmidt and Zimmerman wounded. The regiment took up its winter-quarters in Maastricht.

In 1710, the regiment campaigned on the Rhine and took up its winter-quarters in the County of Salms.

In 1711 and 1712, the regiment served on the Rhine again and then in Flanders. It took up its winter-quarters in Maastricht.

In 1713, the regiment joined the corps of General von Ranzow at Venlo and then repassed the Rhine at Köln.

In 1714, the Hanoverian Contingent returned home.

Uniform

The uniform of the regiment consisted of a white coat lined red with red distinctive and yellow metal.

Standards

no information found

References

This article incorporates texts from the following books which are now in the public domain: