Serényi Dragoons

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Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> Austrian Army >> Serényi Dragoons

Origin and History

On 20 December 1688, Donat Heissler Baron von Heitersheim GFWM, already proprietor of a cuirassier regiment (Regiment C 25, raised in 1682 by Colonel Hallewyl, disbanded in 1775 as “Podstatzky”), received from Emperor Leopold I a decree to raise a dragoon regiment of 1,000 horse (10 coys.) at his own expense. This regiment was most probably raised in Bohemia. It was reviewed by General-Commissar Count Caraffa in April 1689.

In 1689, Margrave Ludwig von Baden was commander of the army in Hungary while Count Heissler, promoted to FML for the occasion, commanded in Transylvania. After being reviewed, the regiment received orders to join the army of the Margrave of Baden. However, FML Heissler asked for some reinforcements and his regiment was redirected to Transylvania. On 11 August, it arrived at Kaschau (present-day Košice/SK) and, on 24 August, reached Klausenburg (present-day Cluj/RO). By the end of the year, the regiment was with Heissler at Bucharest. At the end of February 1690, threatened by superior Tatar forces, Heissler retreated to Transylvania. In April, the regiment was sent to Hungary under the command of FM Count Trautmannsdorf. On 21 August, FML Heissler was captured by Thököly's troops near Kronstadt (present-day Brasov/RO). He was freed (receiving “Pardon” from Thököly) and, on 23 October, arrived at Grosswardein (present-day Oradea/RO). After paying 7,000 Ducats, Heissler got finally free.

For the next years, the regiment fought in Transylvania.

On 9 February 1692, Count Heissler was promoted to General of cavalry (G.d.C) and, with the authorisation of the emperor, sold his regiment on 11 April to Philipp Jacob de la Porte, until then colonel-lieutenant in this regiment. In 1693, Count Heissler was appointed General Superintendent of War (General-Kriegskommissar) and resigned also from his title of colonel of a cuirassier regiment (Johann Andreas Count Corbelli was appointed as new proprietor).

Until the end of 1693, La Porte Dragoons remained in Transylvania and Hungary and participated in the unsuccessful siege of Belgrade. On 16 November 1693, Colonel de la Porte sold his regiment, with the authorisation of the emperor, to Colonel Franz Joseph Count Serényi.

On 26 August 1696, at the Battle of Olasch, G.d.C. Count Heissler was mortally wounded while he tried at the head of 6 battalions to storm a Turkish barricade of wagons. He died on 31 August at Szegedin.

In 1697, the regiment distinguished itself in the Battle of Zenta.

Until 1698, the regiment continued to fight against the Turks in Hungary and Transylvania.

At the beginning of 1699, after the signature of the Treaty of Karlowitz, the regiment marched to its newly designated garrison place in Silesia. In May, it arrived in Ratibor (present-day Raciborz/PL) and Oppeln (present-day Opolie/PL) where it remained until 1701.

Franz Joseph Count Serényi - Source: photo made available to Harald Skala by Dr. Marie Mžykova CSc, portrait kept at the Castle of Třeboň/CZ and photographed by G. Čapkova

Since its creation, the successive proprietors of the regiment were:

  • since 20 December 1688: Donat Heissler Count Heitersheim (or Heitersheimb)
  • from 11 April 1692: Jacob Philipp von der Porthen (or de la Porte)
  • from 16 November 1693 to 28 June 1705: Franz Joseph Count Serényi
  • from 16 September 1705 to September 1713: Carl Colona Count zu Fels
  • from 14 November 1713 to 31 October 1733: Eberhard Ludwig Duke of Württemberg

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the regiment was successively commanded by:

  • since 16 November 1693: Franz Joseph Count Serényi, the proprietor of the regiment
  • from 7 June 1703 to 170?: Johann Gabriel Baron von Selb
  • from 24 May 1708 to 17??: Franz Bernhard von Heissler
  • from 4 April 1711 to 2 Oct. 1727: Josef Baron Wadderborn von Dundi


Service during the War

On 16 December 1700, the regiment received orders to march to Italy. However, due to bad weather, departure from Silesia was postponed till the beginning of 1701.

On 25 May 1701, under the command of FML Nikolaus Count Pálffy, the regiment arrived at Castello della Pietra (unidentified location), north of Rovereto where all dragoon regiments were brought to their complete effective of 6 squadrons for a total of 1,000 men and 880 horses per regiment. When Prince Eugène de Savoie launched the invasion of Northern Italy, he chose to cross the Alps and thus outflank Catinat's positions. On 26 May, the regiment was part of Pálffy's Corps who marched through the mountains by Terragnolo and Val Arsa and then south towards Legnano where it had to collect boats to build a bridge on the Adige River. On 3 June, a detachment of 25 Corbelli Cuirassiers and Serényi Dragoons passed the Adige near Albaredo on a ferry-boat, captured a French NCO and 8 soldiers and safely returned. On 10 June, after FML Pálffy had been reinforced by GFWM Serényi with Pálffy Cuirassiers, the bridge near Castelbaldo was completed. On 26 June, FML Pálffy passed the Adige with 4,000 horse, the entire army then progressively followed. The army then marched in two columns towards the bridge on the Tartaro at Trecenta, the regiment was part of the second column under Pálffy and Commercy. The French then retreated to Carpi, realizing too late that the Imperialists had already passed the bridges. On 9 July, Eugène captured the place in the Combat of Carpi. On 12 July, during his advance on Bovolone FML Pálffy annihilated a few French outposts. As per the order of battle of 18 July, Serényi Dragoons counted 6 sqns and was posted in the first line of the left wing under GFWM Count Dietrichstein with a detachment in the second line of the left wing under the GFWM Marquis Vaubonne. On 19 July, GFWM Serényi was detached with 500 horse to reconnoitre the Franco-Spanish positions at Mantua. Near Castiglione Mantovano, he bumped into a Spanish detachment and took it prisoners. On 28 July, the whole Imperial army crossed the Mincio River and followed the enemy up to the Oglio. On 31 July, the Imperial army encamped the army near Lonato. Catinat retreated towards Acquafredda, closely followed by GFWM Serényi with 500 troopers. Near Carpenedolo, Serényi came to contact with a detachment (150 men) of Catinat's rearguard, killing 20 of them, taking several others prisoners. On 4 August, Serényi reached Castel Goffredo which surrendered without opposing any resistance. After a few successful actions, Serényi returned to Eugène's camp from his reconnaissance with important information. On 9 August, GFWM Serényi was sent with his dragoon regiment, Savoyen Dragoons and Dietrichstein Dragoons to support FML Pálffy at Palazzolo. Pálffy had been instructed to cut the line of supply of the Franco-Spanish army along the Oglio River. On 29 August, Pálffy's Corps, including Serényi Dragoons, set of from Palazzolo rejoined the main army. In the night of 19 to 20 August, the Imperial army marched from Roncadelle to Urago. By 30 August, Eugène had retired to Chiari where he established a fortified camp. On 1 September, Serényi Dragoons took part in the Battle of Chiari where the Imperial army broke the assaults of the Maréchal de Villeroy against its camp. During the following weeks, there were several skirmished between Imperial troops and the enemy. Captain Colomba of the regiment distinguished himself on many occasions (Prince Eugène would later, on 2 March 1702, appoint him as his general-adjutant). On 24 November, GFWM Vaubonne, Colonel Paul Deák and Captain Colomba attacked the French rearguard, killing 200 men and capturing 76 men, 80 horses and 60 oxen. On 5 December, Prince Eugène, accompanied by Lieutenant-Colonel Baron Selb and 500 horse, reconnoitred Marcaria and summoned the garrison who refused to surrender. On 6 December, Mansfeld Infantry, Starhemberg Infantry and Serény Dragoons with 6 guns arrived in front of Marcaria whose garrison surrendered. On 8 December, Major Heissler of Serényi Dragoons occupied Castellucchio. On 21 December, Serényi Dragoons marched from Sermide to Borgoforte and took its winter-quarters on the Po River.

In March 1702, the regiment received 107 recruits bringing it to it full effective of 1,000 men and 880 horses. According to the order of battle, GFWM Serényi commanded the right wing of first line. By 27 April, the Imperial army was ready for the incoming campaign. On 5 May, Count Serényi received orders to take position between Campitello and Marcaria with his dragoon regiment and Commercy Cuirassiers. On 22 May, General-Adjutant Colomba and d´Avia with 150 horse were sent to reconnoitre the Franco-Spanish positions. On 23 May, Eugène brought his army behind the lines of the Fossa Maestra. Only 600 foot were left at Cerese. On 3 June, during a skirmish between vanguards, General-Adjutant Colomba was killed. By this date, Serényi Dragoons were encamped at Montanara. In the night of 31 July to 1 August, Prince Eugène abandoned the blockade of Mantua. Part of his troops marched to Borgoforte, part to Governolo. On 3 August, Prince Eugène passed to the right bank of the Po with his army and encamped at Sailetto. On15 August, the regiment (then counting 732 men) took part in the Battle of Luzzara where it belonged to the rearguard. It attacked the causeway. During this battle, the regiment suffered heavy losses. From 19 August, the Imperial army erected a fortified camp near Luzzara. During the following weeks, only small skirmishes took place. At the beginning of November, both armies retired from the region of Luzzara. Serényi Dragoons took their quarters in Carbonara on the Po, Carbonarola and Moglia di Sermide. By the end of the year, the regiment counted 805 men and 273 horses.

For the campaign of 1703 in Northern Italy, FZM Guido Count Starhemberg replaced Prince Eugène de Savoie, as commander-in-chief in Italy. Indeed, Prince Eugène was recalled to Vienna to act as President of the Hofkriegsrat (War Council). The Imperial Army of Italy was seriously outnumbered by the Franco-Spanish army and Starhemberg, posted near Ostiglia and along the Secchia, was forced to adopt a defensive stance. However, on 7 October, Duke Victor Amadeus II of Savoy suddenly changed allegiance, siding with the Empire. He had been promised the support 20,000 Imperial troops. Accordingly, Starhemberg marched with 13,000 infantry to effect a junction with the Savoyard Army in Piedmont, leaving a few troops on the Secchia under the command of G.d.C. Count Trautmannsdorf. Among the troops sent to Piedmont were 4 sqns of Serényi Dragoons. Count Serényi, who had just been appointed general-adjutant, accompanied this corps. According to the order of battle, Serényi Dragoons were part of the wing under FML Prince Thomas de Vaudémont within the brigade of GFWM Carl Colona von Fels. On 24 December, this corps set off from Ostiglia and reached Borgo San Domino in the evening of 31 December. Two sqns of Serényi Dragoons had been left on the Secchia with G.d.C. Trautmannsdorf's Corps (approx. 8,000 men of poor quality). In December, the 2 sqns on the Secchia received 100 horses brought by Captain Hertenhalch.

At the beginning of 1704, 3 sqns of Serényi Dragoons were attached to Trautmannsdorf's Corps, on the Secchia and in Ostiglia, and 3 other to Starhemberg's Corps in Piedmont.

  • on the Secchia and in Ostiglia: In March, G.d.C. Trautmannsdorf, commander of the Army of Italy, fell ill and was replaced by G.d.C. Prince Thomas de Vaudémont who was killed in action on 12 May. Then, G.d.C. Count Leiningen assumed command of the Imperial Army in Italy which was in poor condition. At the end of June, Leiningen was obliged to retreat behind the Tartaro River and up to Villabona and South Tyrol. His army consisted of only 6,151 foot, 3,270 horse (only 1,433 being mounted). Furthermore, 954 foot and 1,273 cavalrymen were unfit for duty. In such a situation, Leiningen was unable to march towards Piedmont as ordered. Even after the arrival of a reinforcement of 5,000 men from Germany, Leiningen could only concentrate his troops around Lodrone in Trentino and march to Coglione (unidentified location) to await further reinforcements which included a sqn of Serényi Dragoons under Captain Friedrich Anton Vidomi. Leiningen took his winter-quarters with his cavalry between Sopra Ponte and Nave.
  • in Piedmont: In January, Starhemberg's Corps marched by Stradella, Voghera, Castelnuovo, San Giuliano, Castellazzo, Canelli, Castagnole and Alba where, on 16 January, it effected a junction with the Savoyard Army. Starhemberg's Corps (approx. 12,000 men) took a well deserved rest at Vercelli. In March, the Duc de Vendôme concentrated his Franco-Spanish army (approx. 33.000 men) near Casale. On 3 and 4 May, the Allies (approx. 22.000 men) concentrated their army near Villanova. On 7 May, the Allies retreated to the fortified camp at Crescentino. On 12 May, GFWM Serényi was promoted to FML and transferred to the Imperial corps at Ostiglia. On 5 June, Vendôme laid siege to Vercelli. Attempts by the Allies to relieve the fortress failed and, on 20 July, Vercelli capitulated. In September Vendôme occupied Ivrea and Aosta and the whole Dora valley. Despite bad weather conditions, Vendôme started the siege of Verrua. On 26 December, Duke Victor Amadeus made a sortie where 3 sqns of Serényi Dragoons took part, attached to the brigade of GFWM Carl Colona von Fels. The sortie had no significant result.

By January 1705, the regiment counted 465 men, excluding staff. It was distributed on several theatres of operation: 3 sqns were with the Allies in Piedmont; 1 sqn (along with the proprietor of the regiment) with Leiningen's Corps at Gavardo near Lake Garda; 1 sqn, in Bavaria enlisting recruits; and 1 sqn in Hungary fighting rebels.

  • in Northern Italy, Prince Eugène superseded Leiningen as commander-in-chief. However, Leiningen continued to assume command of a corps of Eugène's Army. In the night of 27 to 28 June, the proprietor of the regiment, FML Franz Josef Count Serényi drowned while attempting to ford the Oglio at the head of Savoyen Dragoons and Herbeville Dragoons. On 16 August, the squadron serving under Leiningen took part in the Battle of Cassano where it was attached to the third column. It distinguished itself in this battle. On 16 September, GFWM Karl Colona von Fels was appointed proprietor of the former Serényi Dragoons. At the end of the year, the depot squadron formerly stationed in Bavaria joined Eugène's. On 26 December, Eugène's Army took its winter-quarters. Its cavalry was quartered between Gavardo and Breno.
  • in Piedmont, the Allies, including 3 sqns of Serényi Dragoons, took their winter-quarters on 14 March and Verrua capitulated on 9 April. Operations then came to a standstill until 4 June when the Duc de Vendôme arrived in Piedmont. By mid-June, the 3 sqns of Serényi Dragoons were part of the garrison of Castagnetto. At the end of July, the garrison of Castagnetto was ordered to retire on Turin and marched by San Mauro. In November, the Allies took their winter-quarters around Turin.

In June 1706, Duke Victor Amadeus of Savoy set off from Turin, leaving FML Wirich Daun with 6 Imperial bns, the Savoyard infantry, 500 horse (including 1 sqn of Colona von Fels Dragoons) and 1,000 dismounted cavalrymen to defend Turin. The Duke of Savoy then marched by Carmagnola, Saluzzo and Bobbio in the Lucerna Valley. On 1 September the Duke of Savoy finally effected a junction with Prince Eugène's Army at Asti. After this junction, the 4 sqns of Colona von Fels Dragoons were deployed on the right wing of the third line under FML Prince von Darmstadt and GFWM Count Roccavion. On 7 September, these sqns took part in the victorious Battle of Turin where they captured a pair of kettle-drums (when the regiment later marched to the Netherlands, these kettle-drums were confided to Franciscan monks in Innsbruck). On 5 November, the Colona von Fels Dragoons were in Pavia; on 12 November, in Piacenza. They took their winter-quarters between the Oglio and the Po, in the region of Piacenza, Modena and Parma.

At the beginning of June 1707, FML Carl Colona von Fels and his dragoon regiment joined the Imperial army assembling at Orbassano for the planned invasion of Provence. On 3 July, when Eugène's Army set off from its camps for Provence, the Colona von Fels Dragoons formed part of the fourth corps under GFWM Falkenstein. The regiment then took part in the unsuccessful siege of Toulon. When the Allies retreated to Piedmont, the regiment took its winter-quarters near Mantua while 58 dragoons were enlisting recruits in Bavaria and buying horses in Bohemia.

On 31 January 1708, the regiment received orders to march to Bohemia where it would await further instructions before marching to the Netherlands. FML Carl Colona von Fels would also accompany his regiment in Bohemia. In mid-February, the regiment marched from Italy, arriving in the region of Pilsen (present-day Plzeň/CZ) and Prague on 27 April. At the end of May, after replenishing its ranks, the regiment set off for the Netherlands, marching by Hanau and Frankfurt. On 18 June, it reached Rheinfels where the commander of the place refused to allow it passage. Accordingly, the regiment passed the Rhine at Braubach and resumed its march towards the Spanish Netherlands, reaching Ath on 8 August. It later took part in the siege and capture of Lille under Prince Eugène. During the siege, it followed Prince Eugène who effected a junction with Marlborough and relieved Bruxelles.

In January 1709, the regiment counted 12 coys for a total of 913 men (25 unfit for duty) and 784 horses (including 138 horses in poor condition). A squadron was sent to Bohemia to raise new recruits and to buy horses. By 23 June, the Allies were posted between Courtrai and Menin. The sqns of the regiment were attached to to the first line of the right wing under G.d.C. Count Vehlen, FML Count Reising and GFWM Count Vehlen. On 7 July, the sixth squadron sent to Bohemia rejoined the regiment. On 11 September, the regiment took part in the sanguinary Battle of Malplaquet where it was deployed on the right wing of the first line in Colona von Fels's Corps, in FML Count Reysing's division and in GFWM Prince Lobkowitz's Brigade. The regiment distinguished itself when it attacked a French cuirassier regiment and captured (as in the Battle of Turin) a pair of kettle-drums. Emperor Joseph I gave to the regiment the privilege to use the captured cuirassier kettle-drums at any future celebrations.

On 12 March 1710, Carl Colona von Fels, the proprietor of the regiment, was promoted to General of cavalry (G.d.C). At the end of April, the Allies encamped at Vitry to lay siege to Douai. The regiment (12 coys in 6 sqns for a total of 1,000 men) was deployed on the right wing of the first line of Prince Eugène's Army in the Colona von Fels's Corps, in FML Lagnasc's Division in GFWM Count Vehlen's Brigade. In November, the regiment was reviewed, it then counted 922 men, 741 horses.

On 4 April 1711, Colonel-Lieutenant Josef Wadderborn von Dundi was promoted commander of the regiment. On 14 June, Prince Eugène sent 2,000 men (including the present regiment) towards the Rhine. In the Autumn, when it was reviewed, the regiment was at full strength, fielding 1,000 men. At the beginning of November, it was ordered to march to Bohemia where it took its winter-quarters.

In the Spring of 1712, the regiment joined a corps assembling under Colona von Fels to reinforce the Imperial army campaigning in the Low Countries. In May, the proprietor of the regiment, Carl Colona von Fels, was appointed Reichsgraf (count). In July, the regiment (984 men, 899 horses) took part in the siege and capture of Le Quesnoy. It was then attached to Albemarle's Corps to guard the line of communication between the Scheldt and the Scarpe.

In May 1713, the regiment followed the Imperial army who marched from the Low Country to the Upper Rhine. By the end of the month, it was posted near Lampertheim and Hofheim. On 23 June, the regiment was reviewed, it then counted 998 men and 962 horses. In November, the proprietor of the regiment, Carl Count Colona von Fels, died. The new proprietor was the reigning Duke of Würtemberg, Eberhard Ludwig. The regiment spent winter at Hildesheim.

On 6 March 1714, the Treaty of Rastatt was signed between Habsburg and Bourbon. However, negotiations between France and the Holy Roman Empire continued. Therefore, Imperial troops were kept in readiness throughout the year. At the end of March, the regiment went from Hildesheim through the Sauerland to the County of Neuwied where it remained for several months. It then returned to Hildesheim where it spent winter.

Uniform

Uniform in 1701

Troopers

Uniform in 1701 - Copyright: Kronoskaf
Uniform Details
as per Donath

Headgear black tricorne laced white.

To distinguish soldiers (from corporal down to privates) of each company, a button or rosette at the colour of the company was attached to the tricorne. As a field sign, green foliage was attached to the tricorne in summer and a wisp of straw in the winter.

The tricorne was worn only in the service, otherwise soldiers always wore a Holz-Kappe (fatigue cap). Hair had to be of a standard length and tied with a black ribbon.

Neck stock white
Coat yellow with black lining; brass buttons along the right side
Collar none
Shoulder strap none
Lapels none
Pockets horizontal pockets, each with 3 brass buttons
Cuffs black, each with 3 brass buttons
Turnbacks none
Waistcoat black with brass buttons. In summer, it was replaced by a linen cloth waistcoat.
Breeches buckskin
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt no information found
Waistbelt a wide belt of yellow deer or buffalo leather worn above the waistcoat
Cartridge Box natural leather cartridge pouch worn on a belt on the left shoulder and containing 24 cartridges
Scabbard leather scabbard with an iron tip protector and a brass mouth piece
Footgear Low riding boots made of Russian leather with a knee pad.
Horse Furniture
Saddle-cloth red edged with a wide yellow braid
Housings red edged with a wide yellow braid
Blanket roll blue and white


Troopers were armed with a double-edged backsword, a pair of pistols, a musket and a bayonet.

The riding mantle was white with a collar in the same colour as the cuffs of the coat.

NCOs

no information found yet

Officers

Uniforms of officers differed from those of the privates and NCOs by the finer material used. Buttons were gilt or silver-plated and golden embroideries decorated the cuffs, pocket flaps and saddle-cloth.

Officers wore a black and yellow silk sash across the chest or around the waist.

Musicians

Drummers were dressed according to the regiment owner's tastes. They often wore brightly coloured uniforms with:

  • a plumed black round slouch hat
  • a curled periwig down to the shoulders
  • a white cravat
  • a comfortable red or blue coat with wide skirts reaching above the knees, decorated with ribbons and braids
  • red breeches
  • riding boots made of Russian leather with a knee pad

Uniform in 1709

Troopers

Uniform in 1709 - Copyright: Kronoskaf
Uniform Details
as per Donath

Headgear black tricorne laced yellow.

To distinguish soldiers (from corporal down to privates) of each company, a button or rosette at the colour of the company was attached to the tricorne. As a field sign, green foliage was attached to the tricorne in summer and a wisp of straw in the winter.

The tricorne was worn only in the service, otherwise soldiers always wore a Holz-Kappe (fatigue cap). Hair had to be of a standard length and tied with a black ribbon.

Neck stock white
Coat red with black lining; brass buttons along the right side
Collar none
Shoulder strap white ribbons and knot on the right shoulder
Lapels none
Pockets horizontal pockets, each with 3 brass buttons
Cuffs black, each with 3 brass buttons
Turnbacks none
Waistcoat red with brass buttons. In summer, it was replaced by a linen cloth waistcoat.
Breeches buckskin
Leather Equipment
Crossbelt no information found
Waistbelt a wide belt of yellow deer or buffalo leather worn above the waistcoat
Cartridge Box natural leather cartridge pouch worn on a belt on the left shoulder and containing 24 cartridges
Scabbard leather scabbard with an iron tip protector and a brass mouth piece
Footgear Low riding boots made of Russian leather with a knee pad.
Horse Furniture
Saddle-cloth red edged with a wide yellow braid
Housings red edged with a wide yellow braid
Blanket roll blue and white


Troopers were armed with a double-edged backsword, a pair of pistols, a musket and a bayonet.

The riding mantle was white with a collar in the same colour as the cuffs of the coat.

NCOs

no information found yet

Officers

Uniforms of officers differed from those of the privates and NCOs by the finer material used. Buttons were gilt or silver-plated and golden embroideries decorated the cuffs, pocket flaps and saddle-cloth.

Officers wore a black and yellow silk sash across the chest or around the waist.

Musicians

Drummers were dressed according to the regiment owner's tastes. They often wore brightly coloured uniforms with:

  • a plumed black round slouch hat
  • a curled periwig down to the shoulders
  • a white cravat
  • a comfortable red or blue coat with wide skirts reaching above the knees, decorated with ribbons and braids
  • red breeches
  • riding boots made of Russian leather with a knee pad

Standards

From 1657 to 1705, all Austrian (Imperial) dragoon regiments carried the same white Leibstandarte (colonel standard). It was fringed in gold and, on both sides, the border was decorated with a golden floral pattern:

  • obverse (right): centre design consisted of an armed black Imperial double-eagle with the arms of Austria on a shield, surmounted by a crown and by the motto "Pro Deo Et Cesarem"
  • reverse (left): the Mother of God (which had been declared the patroness of the army by Kaiser Ferdinand III) on a cloud and surrounded by rays
Leibfahne from 1657 to 1705 – Copyright: Kronoskaf

From 1657 to 1705, the obverse (right side) of the Ordinärestandarten (regimental standards) of all Austrian (Imperial) dragoon regiments was of an identical pattern and consisted of an armed black Imperial double-eagle with the arms of Austria on a shield, surmounted by a crown. The border of the obverse was decorated with a floral pattern in the metal colour of the regiment.

References

This article incorporates texts from the following books which are now in the public domain:

  • Abtheilung für Kriegsgeschichte des k. k. Kriegs-Archives: Feldzüge des Prinzen Eugen von Savoyen, Series 1, Vol. 1, Vienna 1875, pp. 212-213, 221-222, 227

Dedekind, F.: Geschichte des k. k. Kaiser Franz Joseph I. Dragoner-Regimentes Nr. 11, Vienna 1879

Acknowledgement

Harald Skala for the initial version of this article