Tercio de Trincheria

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Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> Spanish Army (Bourbon) >> Tercio de Trincheria

Origin and History

In 1701, King Philip V, the new Bourbon king of Spain, authorised Don Blas de Trincheria to raise a tercio destined to reinforce the Army of Lombardy. By 30 May, the new unit had completed its recruitment in Barcelona. It consisted of Catalan migueletes (light troops) who had served under Trincheria during the Nine Years' War (1688–97).

In 1707, the tercio was transformed into a regiment designated as the “Regimiento de Cataluña”.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the tercio was under the command of:

  • from 1701: Don Blas de Trincheria
  • from 17??: Count Darnius
  • from 17??: Don Menna Sentmanat

The regiment was disbanded on 15 November 1721 and formed the second battalion of another unidentified regiment.

Service during the War

In 1701, the new unit then embarked for Naples. During the journey, a mutiny burst, the soldiers complaining that they had received only one doubloon out of the six promised when they were recruited. Trincheria managed to put an end to the mutiny but changed course and landed at Mahon on the Island of Minorca. From Mahon, the unit was sent to Melilla on the coast of North Africa to defend it against an attack of the Moors.

On 24 May 1703, the tercio distinguished itself in a sortie, driving the Moors out of their siege works and inflicting them a loss of 2,000 men.

In 1704 and 1705, the tercio served once more at Melilla.

On 30 September 1706, the tercio was ordered to set off from Melilla and to go to garrison Ceuta.

In February 1707, the tercio was transformed into a regiment designated as the “Regimiento de Cataluña”.

In 1708, the regiment left Ceuta and went to Andalusia.

In 1709, the regiment moved to the district of Catalonia, where it remained until it was ordered to join the Army of Aragon. During its long sojourn in North Africa, the unit had lost much discipline and had to be reorganised on 22 July.

On 20 August 1710, the regiment was at the disastrous Battle of Saragossa. It then followed the army who retired in the Province of Soria. It sojourned in Old Castile and Extremadura to re-established itself and was then assigned to the corps guarding the frontier of Portugal, participating in several skirmishes.

Uniform

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Privates

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Officers

Uniforms of officers differed from those of privates and NCOs by the finer material used. Their waistcoat, saddle cloth and housings were edged with a wide golden braid.

In the infantry, officers wore a silver or gold gorget and a spontoon.

The regulation of 30 December 1704 specified the distinctive of each military rank:

  • colonel: a baton with a gold knob
  • lieutenant-colonel: a baton with a silver knob
  • sargento mayor: a baton with a silver topped knob
  • captain: baton as worn under the reign of the Habsburg
  • lieutenant: baton as worn under the reign of the Habsburg
  • sub-lieutenant: baton with a horn band and a silver ring

NCOs

The regulation of 30 December 1704 specified the distinctive of each military rank:

  • sergeant : baton without knob and halberd
  • mariscal de logis (quartermaster): small white woolen epaulette
  • brigadier: swagger stick
  • corporal of squadron: swagger stick
  • second corporal of squadron (rank suppressed in 1706): swagger stick

Musicians

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Colours

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References

This article is mostly made of abridged and adapted excerpts from the following books which are now in the public domain:

  • Clonard, Conde de, Historia Orgánica de las Armas de Infantería y Caballería, vol. X, Madrid, 1851-62, pp. 447-454