Tercio de Valdesevilla

From Project WSS
Jump to navigationJump to search

Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> Spanish Army (Bourbon) >> Tercio de Valdesevilla

Origin and History

In 1702, Don Alonso de Figueroa, Marquis de Valdesevilla proposed to King Philip V to create a new unit, the “Tercio de Valdesevilla”. The tercio was created on 29 December 1702. It initially consisted of only 500 men.

On 29 September 1704, the tercio was transformed into a regiment consisting of 12 companies (each of 50 men and 3 officers) in a single battalion.

On 28 February 1706, the unit was renamed “Regimiento de Antequera”.

On 10 December 1710, a second battalion was added to the regiment.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the tercio was under the command of:

  • from 29 December 1702: Don Alonso de Figueroa, Marquis de Valdesevilla

On 16 June 1715, the regiment was disbanded and incorporated in the “Regimiento de Málaga”.

Service during the War

In 1703, the tercio joined the Army of Extremadura.

In 1704, the tercio joined the Army of Extremadura for the planned invasion of Portugal. It took part in the siege of Marvao under the General Marquis de Villadarias. On 8 June, the place surrendered. On 12 June, it was among the troops who laid siege to Castelo de Vide who surrendered on 26 June. The tercio then formed part of the garrison of the place. In mid-September, it was transferred to the Army of Andalusia and marched to Gibraltar in preparation of the siege. On 29 September, the tercio was transformed into a regiment designated as the “Regimiento de Valdesevilla”. On 21 October, the regiment opened the tranches in front of Gibraltar. In the night of 11 November, it was placed at the head of a column who vainly tried to storm the British positions.

In 1705, when the siege of Gibraltar was abandoned, the regiment was sent to garrison Cádiz.

In 1708, the regiment still served on the Island of Cádiz However, the government had reason to suspect that British agents had convinced the Emperor of Morocco to increase the forces of his line of observation in front of Ceuta. Therefore, the regiment was sent to Ceuta.

In 1709, relieved by other units, the regiment embarked for Algeciras. Upon arrival, it was immediately sent to join the Army of Extremadura where it was brigaded with the “Regimiento de Málaga” in the first line under the command of Brigadier Don Blas Dragoneti. On 7 May, the regiment took part in the Battle of La Gudiña.

In 1712, the regiment was transferred from Extremadura to Andalusia. Upon arrival, it was redirected to the camp of Gibraltar. It later embarked at Algeciras for Ceuta where it assumed garrison duty.

In 1714, the Moroccans attacked Ceuta. On 27 and 29 June, the regiment, along with the “Regimiento de Toro”, distinguished itself in the defence of Fort Alcántara and Fort Africa.

In 1715, the regiment continued to serve at Ceuta. On 16 June, it was disbanded and incorporated in the “Regimiento de Málaga”.

Uniform

no information found yet

Privates

no information found yet

Officers

Uniforms of officers differed from those of privates and NCOs by the finer material used. Their waistcoat, saddle cloth and housings were edged with a wide golden braid.

In the infantry, officers wore a silver or gold gorget and a spontoon.

The regulation of 30 December 1704 specified the distinctive of each military rank:

  • colonel: a baton with a gold knob
  • lieutenant-colonel: a baton with a silver knob
  • sargento mayor: a baton with a silver topped knob
  • captain: baton as worn under the reign of the Habsburg
  • lieutenant: baton as worn under the reign of the Habsburg
  • sub-lieutenant: baton with a horn band and a silver ring

NCOs

The regulation of 30 December 1704 specified the distinctive of each military rank:

  • sergeant : baton without knob and halberd
  • mariscal de logis (quartermaster): small white woolen epaulette
  • brigadier: swagger stick
  • corporal of squadron: swagger stick
  • second corporal of squadron (rank suppressed in 1706): swagger stick

Musicians

no information found yet

Colours

Tentative reconstructions of the colours of the regiment based on the successive ordenanzas of 1704, 1706 and 1707 (for more details see our article Spanish (Bourbon) Line Infantry Colours).

Tentative Reconstructions
Colours according to the ordenanzas of 1704, 1706 and 1707 – Copyright: Kronoskaf

References

This article is mostly made of abridged and adapted excerpts from the following books which are now in the public domain:

  • Clonard, Conde de, Historia Orgánica de las Armas de Infantería y Caballería, vol. XIII, Madrid, 1851-62, pp. 380-386