Tercio de las milicias de Málaga

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Hierarchical Path: War of the Spanish Succession (Main Page) >> Armies >> Spanish Army (Bourbon) >> Tercio de las milicias de Málaga

Origin and History

The tercio was created on 13 August 1701 from the militia of Málaga and a company of the Tercio Provincial Nuevo de Murcia. The new tercio was known as the “Tercio de las milicias de Málaga”.

According to an ordonnance published on 28 September 1704, the tercio was transformed into the the “Regimiento de Málaga” on 15 December of the same year. Don Juan de Medina, its former Maestre de Campo remained colonel of the regiment while Don Andrés Caballero became its lieutenant-colonel; and Don Manuel Fernandez de la Casa, its major.

On 28 February 1707, an ordonnance confirmed the name of the regiment.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the tercio was under the command of:

  • from 13 August 1701: Don Juan de Medina

On 12 May 1715, the two battalions of the regiment were amalgamated in a single one. On 16 June, it incorporated the disbanded “Regimiento de Antequera”.

The regiment was disbanded in 1721.

Service during the War

In 1701, after its creation, the tercio remained in Málaga to guard the coast against a possible landing of an Anglo-Dutch force.

According to an ordonnance published on 28 September 1704, the tercio was transformed into a regiment on 15 December of the same year.

In 1705, the regiment was sent from Málaga to reinforce the Bishop of Murcia who was fighting the insurgents of the Province of Valencia. Upon arrival, it was incorporated into the column of Don Luis de Zúñiga who advanced on the outposts of Molinet, Pego and Lasagra around Denia, forcing them to surrender and capturing 400 prisoners. In September, when the Duke of Gandia invested Denia, the regiment took part in the blockade, destroying mills in the neighbourhood and attacking the village of Altea where it took 22 prisoners. In November, it repulsed a sortie launched by 150 insurgents from the Castle of Denia.

From March 1706, the tercio joined the Army of Castile who made itself master of Orihuela and Elche.

On 25 May 1707, the regiment was at the surrender of Játiva who had been besieged for a few days. It was then assigned to the siege of Alcira and Denia but had to embark to relieve Ceuta before the end of the siege.

On 20 November 1708, the regiment drove back an attack of the Moors against Ceuta.

In 1709, the regiment re-embarked and returned to Spain where it joined the Army of Extremadura, being allocated to the brigade of Don Blas Dragonetti in the second line. On 7 May, the regiment was at the Battle of La Gudiña. It then took part in the blockade of Olivenza. On 1 June, a detachment of the regiment made itself master of the Castle of Alconchel. At the end of the campaign, the regiment marched to Algeciras where it embarked for Ceuta. On 26 December, it took part in a combat against the Moors who vainly tried to destroy new outworks.

On 1 May 1710, a second battalion was raised. It was immediately sent from Málaga to the coast of North Africa to garrison Melilla and Peñon de Velez de la Gomera.

In 1712, the second battalion was relieved and sent back to Spain where it joined the Army of Valencia. Meanwhile, the first battalion continued to serve at Ceuta.

In 1713, the second battalion was transferred to Cádiz where it arrived on 5 April.

On 11 February 1714, a company of the garrison of Melilla was incorporated in the second battalion who embarked aboard the fleet. This fleet blockaded Barcelona and detachments of the battalion took part in several operations among which, a raid on Arenys de Mar. The first battalion continued to serve at Ceuta, repulsing two attacks in June. After the surrender of Barcelona, the second battalion was ordered to rejoin the first at Ceuta.

Uniform

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Privates

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Officers

Uniforms of officers differed from those of privates and NCOs by the finer material used. Their waistcoat, saddle cloth and housings were edged with a wide golden braid.

In the infantry, officers wore a silver or gold gorget and a spontoon.

The regulation of 30 December 1704 specified the distinctive of each military rank:

  • colonel: a baton with a gold knob
  • lieutenant-colonel: a baton with a silver knob
  • sargento mayor: a baton with a silver topped knob
  • captain: baton as worn under the reign of the Habsburg
  • lieutenant: baton as worn under the reign of the Habsburg
  • sub-lieutenant: baton with a horn band and a silver ring

NCOs

The regulation of 30 December 1704 specified the distinctive of each military rank:

  • sergeant : baton without knob and halberd
  • mariscal de logis (quartermaster): small white woolen epaulette
  • brigadier: swagger stick
  • corporal of squadron: swagger stick
  • second corporal of squadron (rank suppressed in 1706): swagger stick

Musicians

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Colours

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References

This article is mostly made of abridged and adapted excerpts from the following books which are now in the public domain:

  • Clonard, Conde de, Historia Orgánica de las Armas de Infantería y Caballería, vol. X, Madrid, 1851-62, pp. 486-494